Summer Session

summer session

To register for a summer session course, complete and submit the registration form. Registration begins March 3. For questions, call the Registrar's Office at 802.654.2571.

Summer session housing is also available.

Courses On Campus 2014

Course Code Course Name and Credits Day Time/Dates
BIOLOGY
BI 108 A Topics in Organismal Biology: Human Nutrition - 4cr.

M,T,TH & F

9:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
May 12 - June 6
ENGLISH
EN 329 Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop - 4cr.     M - F     9:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
May 12 - June 6
EN 404 Film and the Environment - 4cr. T,W & TH 6:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
May 13 - June 12
FINE ARTS
AR 127 Ceramics I: Wheelworking - 4cr. M & W 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
May 12 - June 16
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
ES 301

Advanced Topics: Permaculture Design - 2cr.


8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Intensive seven day week for
two weeks beginning
Wednesday, May 28 -
Wednesday, June 11

MODERN LANGUAGES & LITERATURE
SP 102 Second Semester Spanish - 4cr. M - F

8:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
May 12 - June 13

PHILOSOPHY        
PH 103            Intro to Philosophy: Pursuing Wisdom - 4cr. 
MTWTHF 

8:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
May 12 - June 6

Campus Course Descriptions

AR 127 Ceramics I: Wheelworking
Instructor: Jeremy Ayers

LSC: Artistic Experience
Lab fee $250.00

Description: Will provide students with a comprehensive introduction to the practice of throwing on the potters wheel including clay preparation, centering, formation of vessels, trimming, glazing and firing. We will also look at the work of historical and contemporary ceramic artists.
Misc. Notes: The course meets at Burlington City Arts Clay and Craft Studio.

BI 108 Topics in Organismal Biology: Human Nutrition
Instructor: James Willard

LSC: Processes of Scientific Reasoning
Lab fee $105.00

Description: An intensive lab science course for non-science majors that will consider the components of human diets, how such components are processed by the human body, and how nutrition affects human health throughout the life cycle. Topics include the physiological requirements for and chemistry of the main nutrients: carbohydrates, proteins, lipid, minerals and vitamins. Laboratories consisting of computer-assisted dietary analyses will complement material covered in lectures.
Misc. Notes: Biology 106, 108, and 110 are laboratory courses designed for students who are not science majors. They may not be taken by biology majors or minors.

EN 329 Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop
Instructor: Bridget Kerr
LSC: Artistic Experience
Description: Writing About Place - A small workshop in which students write one or two substantial pieces of creative nonfiction, present this material for discussion by their peers and the instructor, and revise and edit it for final presentation (20-30 pages of finished work). Discussions of contemporary and historical examples of creative nonfiction complement the workshops.

EN 404 Film and The Environment
Instructor: Robert Niemi

LSC: Literary Studies
Description: This course surveys a diverse array of fiction, science fiction, and docudrama films that dramatize a broad range of environmental issues, e.g., soil and water conservation, food crises, industrialization, overpopulation, pollution, nuclear energy, fracking, and humanity’s relation to wild animals and the wilderness. We will screen, analyze, discuss, and write these films both in cinematic terms and in terms of the ethical and philosophical issues they raise about the technocratic transformation of life on Earth in the modern era.

Film list: The Grapes of Wrath (1940); Soylent Green (1973); Chinatown (1974); Logan’s Run (1976); An Enemy of the People (1978); China Syndrome (1979); Koyaanisqatsi (1982); Safe (1995); Erin Brockovich (2000); Grizzly Man (2005); Into the Wild (2007); WALL-E (2008); Avatar (2009); Promised Land (2012)

ES 301 Advanced Topics: Permaculture Design Certification
Instructor: Anjanette DeCarlo 
Lab fee $75.00
Description: In this two-week intensive permaculture design certification course, students will learn the fundamentals of permaculture design philosophy, in addition to completing a practicum in order to earn their permaculture design certificates (PDCs).

PH 103 Introduction to Philosophy: Pursuing Wisdom
Instructor: Nicholas Kahm
LSC: Philosophy
Description: The course both shows the student the nature and value of philosophical inquiry, using only primary texts such as Plato’s dialogues and other major philosophical writings, and, at the same time, invites the student to become personally philosophical by developing their own way of seeing the meaning and value of things. One way of coming to see how deeply human and profoundly personal the questions of meaning and value examined in philosophy are is by coming to understand how they would remain unanswered even if some day we were able to answer all the questions of the sciences.

SP 102 Second Semester Spanish
Instructor: Diego Mattos Vazualdo

LSC: Second Language
Description: This course follows SP 101 and continues the development of students' basic language skills all areas. Some course material will be based on Spanish and Latino culture.
Prerequisite: SP 101 or equivalent placement.

Accelerated Summer College courses

The Accelerated Summer College (ASC) is a six-week, eight-credit program that includes room, board and extra-curricular programming. Saint Michael's students are welcome to enroll in this program; you will find more information on the Accelerated Summer College webpage.

Non-ASC students may also enroll in just one of the ASC courses without committing to the entire program. Students should take into consideration that there will be substantial time needed for coursework beyond the published seat time. Enrollment in a course from the list below requires attendance to orientation, which will include computer set-up, on Sunday, May 18. Each course is worth four credits. You may choose from the following: ASC logo

Business Administration

BU 117 Organizational Problem Solving
Fulfills Experiential Learning requirement

This course will engage each student in developing professional skills, working with a team, and providing research and ideas of real value to a company or organization. Each of the sections will partner with a different client, receive a challenge or challenges from that client, conduct research and work to develop solutions, culminating in a public presentation to the client. Along the way, students will learn resume writing, interview skills, research techniques, business etiquette, and presentation skills. Each section has a maximum number of students, so students will indicate their first, second, and third choices of site options of the Vermont-based companies and non-profits, prior to the beginning of the summer program. Learn more about the partnering organizations: Organization Problem Solving.

BU 215 Marketing

This course will provide a review of the fundamental topics in marketing management, and expose the student to various analytical and decision making tools currently used by marketing managers. The course will focus on the various elements of the marketing mix, and on how the marketing manager must control and integrate each of them to achieve competitive advantage.

BU 209 Business Law

This course will explore the nature of the law and the judicial system, their relationship to consumers, ethical behaviors, and the business enterprise. It will introduce students to basic legal concepts governing business transactions, as well as to the constraints imposed and protections offered by the law. Students will also acquire an appreciation for how the contemporary American legal system operates.

BU 214 Management

This survey course covers the basic principles and management fundamentals of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. Topics covered include leadership, group dynamics, team management, motivation, and communication skills.

BU 405 Principles of Advertising

This course focuses on the management of the promotion function in the context of an integrated marketing communications perspective. The course will consist of an in-depth analysis of the uses of advertising, sales promotion, personal selling, direct marketing, social media, and public relations techniques. The emphasis in the course will be on selecting the most appropriate vehicles for transmitting the organization’s marketing message and on integrating the various options into an optimal integrated program.

Computer Science

CS 101 Introduction to Multimedia Computing
LSC: Quantitative Reasoning

An introduction to the fundamental concepts and techniques of computer science through an examination of digital multimedia. Students will learn how pictures, music, and movies are represented in digital formats, as well as how to write programs that manipulate and transform digital media data.

Economics

EC 101 Principles Macroeconomics
LSC: Social and Instituitional Dimensions of Human Behavior

An introduction to the macroeconomic approach to economic analysis. Students learn how to measure and interpret: Gross Domestic Product (GDP), unemployment and price levels through a discussion of fundamental economic concepts and the role of markets. We examine macroeconomic instability through a study of causes and policy prescriptions from two major opposing schools of thought: Classical and Keynesian. We continue with a study of money, interest rates and the Federal Reserve. Current economic problems and policy debates including economic controversies on the role of international trade, monetary and fiscal policy, the deficit, economic growth, and productivity are also highlighted.

EC 103 Principles Microeconomics
LSC: Social and Instituitional Dimensions of Human Behavior

Introduction to how economists interpret the everyday decisions of consumers, businesses, and workers. Develops concepts and models that explain what is produced, how it is produced, and how output is distributed. Applies the insights of economic analysis to real-world questions such as minimum wage, business profits, taxes, outsourcing, and environmental policies.

English

EN 101 College Writing

In this workshop course, constant writing allows students to develop ease in writing, practice academic writing, and experience all aspects of the writing process: considering and understanding purpose and audience; generating ideas; gathering and organizing material; finding and sustaining a focus; developing a thesis; making arguments; using evidence; citing sources; doing multiple revisions; and editing for clarity, style, and correctness.

French

FR 101 First Semester French
LSC: Second Language

This elementary French course is designed to develop basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing) and to introduce students to French and Francophone culture. This course is a carefully sequenced and highly interactive presentation of language and culture in a media-rich course environment including contemporary video shot in France and Québec.
Note: class trips to Canada will require students to have a valid passport or the Enhanced Driver's License to cross the border.

FR 102 Second Semester French
LSC: Second Language

This elementary French course follows FR 101 or its equivalent, and is designed to continue developing basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing) while teaching students about French and Francophone culture. This course is a carefully sequenced and highly interactive presentation of language and culture in a media-rich course environment including contemporary video shot in France and Québec. Prerequisite: Proof of achievement in one semester of French or placement test.
Note: class trips to Canada will require students to have a valid passport or the Enhanced Driver's License to cross the border.

History

HI 101 U.S. History to 1865
LSC: Historical Studies

A survey of the development of a distinctive American culture in the period from 1600 to 1865. An emphasis will be placed on social history and popular ideologies. Students will consider the ways that gender roles, family structure, immigration patterns, labor, religious traditions, racial prejudice, Manifest Destiny and other related factors have shaped the development of our nation.

HI 103 U.S History since 1865
LSC: Historical Studies

A survey of American society and culture from 1865 to the present. An emphasis will be placed on social history and popular ideologies. Students will consider the ways that family structure, immigration patterns, labor, religious traditions, civil rights, women’s liberation, and other related factors have continued to affect our nation.

Mathematics

MA 104 Pre-Calculus

A study of logarithms, exponentials, functions, graphing, polynomial and rational functions, conic sections, trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions, and trigonometric identities.

MA 120 Elementary Statistics
LSC: Quantitative Reasoning

Description of sample data; probability distributions including the Normal distribution; correlation and regression; sampling; hypothesis testing; statistical inference; other topics may include Chi-square tests, multiple regression, and ANOVA.

Political Science

PO 245 International Relations
LSC: Global Issues that Impact the Common Good

This course introduces students to the study of international relations, focusing especially on the interactions between states and non-state actors in the international environment. Emphasis is placed on understanding the major theoretical approaches to international relations, and applying them to consider enduring and contemporary issues and problems in international affairs.

Psychology

PS 101 General Psychology
LSC: Social and Instituitional Dimensions of Human Behavior

An introduction to the field of psychology, its methods, major perspectives, theories, and area specialties, with emphasis on the normal adult human being. The course explores basic psychological areas such as biopsychology, perception, learning, motivation, developmental, personality, social, abnormal, and therapies.

PS 250 Social Psychology

This course focuses on individuals and how their thoughts and behaviors are influenced by the presence, real or imagined, of others. The course will include topics such as the self, social cognition, social influence, group dynamics, prejudice, attraction, helping behavior, aggression and conflict.
LSC: Social and Instituitional Dimensions of Human Behavior

Sociology

SO 101 Introduction to Sociology

This course is an entry level introduction to the basic institutions of society (education, religion, the economy, etc.) and an examination of culture, population, groups, the individual, socialization, social stratification, interpersonal interaction, and community. The "sociological imagination" and standard methods of research and theories are included.
LSC: Social and Instituitional Dimensions of Human Behavior

Hybrid Courses 2014

Spend three days on campus and take the rest of the course online. Housing is available at a reduced rate of $180.00 for on-campus meeting days. Due to the multimedia aspects of these courses, broadband Internet access is required for participation. 

Open to Saint Michael's students and to all college students currently enrolled at another institution - credit may be transferable.

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND ACCOUNTING
BU 205 Business Communications - 4cr.

May 12-June 6, Online duration: 3 weeks
On-Campus Meeting Days: May 12, 13, 14
1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

POLITICAL SCIENCE
PO 101 Introduction to Politics - 4cr. May 12-June 6, Online duration: 3 weeks
On-Campus Meeting Days: May 12, 13, 14
8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
PSYCHOLOGY
PS 256 Abnormal Psychology - 4cr. May 12-June 20, Online duration: 5 weeks
On-Campus Meeting Days: May 12, 13, 14 
9:00 p.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Hybrid Course Descriptions

BU 205 Business Communications
Instructor: Erik Kaarla

Description: This course enhance students’ understanding of communication theory and capability in multiple communication channels and situations. Also develops critical thinking skills and ethical integrity in discerning credible information and responding appropriately. 

PO 101 Introduction to Politics
Instructor: Jeffrey Ayres

LSC: Social and Institutional Dimensions of Human Behavior
Description: An introduction to the basic concepts of politics and the tools of political analysis.

PS 256 Abnormal Psychology
Instructor: Ronald Miller

LSC: Social and Institutional Dimensions of Human Behavior
Description: This course explores historical and contemporary ways of conceptualizing the origins, characteristics, and treatments of psychological/emotional difficulties and problems in living. Problems and disorders to be examined range from minor adjustment problems and common disorders such as depression to more rare, major mental illnesses such as schizophrenia. Through an in-depth examination of a variety of viewpoints on "abnormal" behavior, students are invited to think critically about their own and our society's conception of "mental illness."

Online Courses 2014

ID 498 Internship - 4cr.

Mandatory informational meeting
April 29, Saint Edmund's Hall 105, 4:00 p.m.
May 26 - July 4 (first session)
July 7-August 15 (second session)

ID 499 Internship - 4cr. May 17 - August 15, dates will vary for individual internship applications 
MJD 413 Internship in Media Studies, Journalism and Digital Arts - 4cr. Mandatory informational meeting, March 4 at 5:00 p.m.
May 20 - June 28

Online Course Descriptions

ID 498 Internship
Instructor: Joanne Muehlberger (first session) or Karen Popovich (second session)

Description: The online Internship is designed to support the internship site experience and assist with the integration of learning from the theoretical to the practical by providing a means of reflection and learning. This course offers students the opportunity to share their internship experiences and concerns in a team setting and includes opportunities to develop personal and professional skills. Assignments and online discussions will be related to the internship experience.
Prerequisite: 2.0 GPA/Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors only/Internship applications must be submitted to the Internship Office before taking the course/Open only to students who have not previously completed or are not currently enrolled in BU 498 or ID 498.

ID 499 Internship
Instructor: Staff

Description: The online Internship is designed to support the internship site experience and assist with the integration of learning from the theoretical to the practical by providing a means of reflection and learning. This course offers students the opportunity to share their internship experiences and concerns in a team setting and includes opportunities to develop personal and professional skills. Assignments and online discussions will be related to the internship experience.
Prerequisite: 2.0 GPA/Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors only/Internship applications must be submitted to the Internship Office before taking the course

MJD 413 Internship in Media Studies, Journalism and Digital Arts
Instructor: Allison Cleary

Description: Working in collaboration with media professionals at media organizations and in corporate and non-profit media students put theory into practice by producing media in a professional work environment. Possible activities include producing and distributing media, i.e. websites, articles, films, brochures etc. planning and staging media events; researching and evaluating public relations campaigns; and optimization studies. The internship gives students a practical context in which to examine and interpret issues and concepts they have studied in their Media Studies classroom courses.

Pre-requisite: Permission of Instructor required.

International Study Courses 2014

 AH 280  Culture & Society in Medieval Burgundy - 4cr.
  **Study tour is full for listed term, no longer accepting applicants
 May 10 - May 28
 EN 307  
 Shakespeare in Performance, England -  2cr.
  **Study tour is full for listed term, no longer accepting applicants

 May 23 - June 6

 GL 341
 A Study in Service: Guyana - 2cr.
 May 29 - June 12
 SO 302
 Politics, Culture, and Globalization in Central America, Guatemala - 4cr.
 May 26 - June 19

International Study Course Descriptions

AH 280 Culture & Society in Medieval Burgundy
Instructor: Terryl Kinder and Kathryn Dungy

LSC: Historical Studies or Study of Christian Tradition and Thoughts
Satisfies Experiential Learning requirement
Description: An 18-day academic study-abroad course in Burgundy, France, focusing on the historical, political, artistic, religious, literary, cultural, and social developments of medieval Burgundy. Based in Pontigny, students travel every other day to cities, abbeys, castles, cathedrals, museums, and archaeological sites which are examined in preparatory classes.
Optional Applied Language Component

EN 307 Shakespeare in Performance, England
Instructor: Nick Clary and Joan Wry

LSC: Literary Studies
Satisfies Experiential Learning requirement
Prerequisites: EN 306

Description: This intensive two week study abroad course will focus on two plays performed at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon, two plays performed at the Globe Theatre in London, and a fifth play performed at the Theatre Royal in Winchester. Critical analysis of both text and performance will be enhanced by animated discussion, writing, and research at Wroxton College, in addition to a broader cultural analysis of both contemporary and historic Shakespeare in performance. Travel, cultural field studies, and on-site guest lectures will complement our coursework.

GL 341 A Study in Service: Guyana
Instructor: Katie Kirby and Karen Popovich
Satisfies Experiential Learning requirement
Prerequisites: PH 351

Description: The focus of this trip will be on identifying similarities and differences in what marginalization means in a developing nation as compared to the developed world. Guyana's history provides an excellent example of many factors that contribute to global marginalization experienced by the developing world. The conditions at the service-sites to be visited expose the realities of extreme poverty and neglect. Students will discuss both the universality of suffering inherent in marginalization in any setting and the non-universal, unique circumstances that individuals face.

SO 302 Politics, Culture, and Globalization in Central America, Guatemala
Instructor: Robert Brenneman and Gabriela Ochoa-Brenneman
LSC: Global Issues that Impact the Common Good or Social and Institutional Dimensions of Human Behavior
Satisfies Experiential Learning requirement

Description: Guatemala is one of the most exciting places to visit and to study in the Western Hemisphere. Its vibrant indigenous culture - representing about half the country's population - has ancient roots but is nevertheless constantly adapting to a changing modern world. Its terrain, with gorgeous lakes and towering volcanoes, coffee-covered slopes and rain forests, will take your breath away. And it's political history sadness reveals the on-going tragedy of US interventionism, whether in the "Cold" War of the 20th century or the "Drug War" of the 21st century. In this twenty-five day trip, students will study sociology in an urban setting during the week, living with a Guatemalan family and putting emerging Spanish skills into practice, while taking trips as a group to the indigenous highlands during the weekends. Readings and sessions will bring students into contact with some of the many intelligent, committed and capable Guatemalan social scientists, religious workers, and community developers. This is a four-credit Sociology course and preparations are underway to make the course eligible to meet the Global Issues requirement.

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