Faculty Profile

George Ashline, PhD

Mathematics Department Chair, Professor of Mathematics

M.S., Ph.D. University of Notre Dame
B.S. St. Lawrence University

View my Curriculum Vitae

Areas of Expertise:

Mathematics education and mathematics pedagogy; mathematical preparation of in-service and pre-service teachers; and complex analysis.

Courses I Teach:

  • Calculus
  • Complex Analysis (view a classroom recording)
  • History of Mathematics
  • Linear Algebra
  • Mathematics Education Seminar
  • Number Theory
  • Real Analysis

Research Interests:

Mathematics education and mathematics pedagogy; mathematical preparation of in-service and pre-service teachers; and complex analysis.

I conduct professional work with K-12 teachers in the state of Vermont. Using my interest and expertise in mathematics teacher professional development, I’ve designed a Mathematics Education seminar for Saint Michael's students.

My teaching has led to a number of peer-reviewed publications describing projects, activities, and initiatives implemented in the classroom. I’m a participant in Project NExT, a program created for new or recent Ph.D.'s in the mathematical sciences who are interested in improving the teaching and learning of undergraduate mathematics.

  • Norbert A. Kuntz Service Award, Fall 2010.
  • Joanne Rathgeb Teaching Award, Fall 2004.
  • Member of Phi Beta Kappa Society, since 1988; President of SMC Gamma chapter, 2004-2005.
  • Member of Saint Michael's chapter of Delta Epsilon Sigma, since 2000; President 2002-2003.
  • Dedication of Saint Michael’s Yearbook, 2001.
  • Saint Michael's College Class of 2000 Rev. Gerald E. Dupont Award.
  • Charter member of Saint Michael’s College Chapter of Pi Mu Epsilon, since 2003.

I co-wrote the article "Using Mathematically Rich Tasks to Deepen the Pedagogical Content Knowledge of Primary Teachers" which has been published as a chapter in the Springer-Verlag text Tasks in Primary Mathematics Teacher Education: Purpose, Use and Exemplars (2009). I also recently co-developed and co-taught the course "Geometry in the Middle Grades and Geometric Reasoning in Grades 9-12" for mathematics teachers through the Vermont Mathematics Partnership; I created course materials and co-taught "Number Theory for Elementary Teachers" through the Vermont Mathematics Initiative.

Life Off Campus:

I am originally from upstate New York and grew up in Rouses Point, adjacent to Canada and beautiful Lake Champlain. I enjoy biking, hiking, snowshoeing, and playing basketball.  I also commute daily to work by bicycle.

Favorite Famous Quotes about Mathematics:  

"What science can there be more noble, more excellent, more useful for men, more admirably high and demonstrative, than this of the mathematics." - Benjamin Franklin

"One thing I have learned in a long life: that all our science measured against reality is primitive and childlike - and yet it is the most precious thing we have." - Albert Einstein

George Ashline, chair and professor of mathematics, during the week of July 21-25 co-taught the course Number Theory for Teachers as part of the Vermont Mathematics Initiative (VMI). The VMI is a three-year, statewide, comprehensive professional development program in mathematics for Vermont teachers to prepare them to become highly effective mathematics instructors with strong mathematics content knowledge, problem-solving skills, and leadership skills. Thirty elementary, middle-level, and high-school teachers from across the state were actively engaged in the week-long course. On June 23 and 24, George engaged a group of more than 30 Vermont high school students in the presentation "Estimating the Circumference of the Earth – Following in the Shadow of Eratosthenes" as part of the Governor's Institute of Vermont Mathematics Institute, a week-long summer program for outstanding high school students, held at the University of Vermont. On June 9, George presented "Correlation Properties and Applications" to one AP class and "Exponential Functions in Snowflakes, Carpets, and Paper Folding" to two other math classes at Brattleboro High School. Through several activities in the first workshop, George led investigations by students of the definition and properties of the correlation coefficient and lines of best fit for pairs of quantitative variables. In the second workshop, students explored exponential functions and their applications and the "Chaos Game." These presentations and visits were sponsored by the Vermont State Mathematics Coalition's "Expanding Horizons Program," through which college and university faculty are invited to give presentations and visit classrooms across the state of Vermont.  During Spring Break week, George gave three invited talks/workshops to different classes/groups of students at Canaan High School in Canaan, Vt. He presented the workshop "Exponential Functions in Snowflakes, Carpets, and Paper Folding" to one Pre-Calculus/Calculus II combined class, followed by an Algebra I class, followed by an Eighth Grade math class. Later during Spring Break, George gave four invited talks/workshops to different classes/groups of students at Milton High School in Milton, Vermont. He presented "Bias and Margin of Error in Statistical Analysis" to two AP Statistics classes, followed by the workshop "Exponential Functions in Snowflakes, Carpets, and Paper Folding" to three Pre-Calculus classes and another version of that workshop to an AP Calculus class. Through several hands-on activities in each workshop, George led investigations by students at those two high schools of relevant concepts in Mathematics and Statistics.  These visits were sponsored by the Vermont State Mathematics Coalition's "Expanding Horizons Program," through which college and university faculty are invited to give presentations and visit classrooms across the state of Vermont.
(posted August 2014)

George Ashline, professor and chair of mathematics, recently gave four invited talks/workshops to different classes/groups of students at U-32 High School in Montpelier, VT. He presented the workshop "Bias and Margin of Error in Statistical Analysis" to one AP Statistics class, the workshop "Exponential Functions in Snowflakes, Carpets, and Paper Folding" to two Algebra II classes, and the workshop "Correlation Properties and Applications" to an Algebra I class. Through several activities in each workshop, George led hands-on investigations by students at that high school of relevant concepts in Statistics and Mathematics. This visit was sponsored by the Vermont State Mathematics Coalition's "Expanding Horizons Program," through which college and university faculty are invited to give presentations and visit classrooms across the state of Vermont. (March 2014)

George Ashline, professor of mathematics, recently gave three invited talks to different classes/groups of students at Danville High School. He presented the workshop "Exponential Functions in Snowflakes, Carpets, and Paper Folding" to a Problem Solving/Pre-Calculus class, followed by a Compound Interest lesson to a Financial Literacy class, followed by the workshop "Correlation Properties and Applications" to a Statistics class combined with a group of advanced students. Through several activities in each workshop, George led investigations by students at that high school of relevant concepts, and he also discussed college math requirements and some of the features/benefits of attending a college like Saint Michael's. This visit was sponsored by the Vermont State Mathematics Coalition's "Expanding Horizons Program," through which college and university faculty are invited to give presentations and visit classrooms across the state of Vermont. (November 2013)


George Ashline, professor of mathematics, recently presented "Exponential Functions in Snowflakes, Carpets, and Paper Folding" to two separate classes at Brattleboro Union High School on May 23. Through several activities in each workshop, George led investigations by students at that high school of exponential functions and their applications, and the "Chaos Game." These presentations and visits were sponsored by the Vermont State Mathematics Coalition's "Expanding Horizons Program," through which college and university faculty are invited to give presentations and visit classrooms across the state of Vermont. He was then invited by a different high school teacher to return to the Brattleboro school on June 4 to give another version of the "Exponential Functions" workshop to one class, and another presentation on "Bias and Margin of Error" to two statistics classes. Also, during the week of July 15-19, George co-taught the course Number Theory for Teachers as part of the Vermont Mathematics Initiative (VMI). The VMI is a three-year, statewide, comprehensive professional development program in mathematics for Vermont teachers to prepare them to become highly effective mathematics instructors with strong mathematics content knowledge, problem solving skills, and leadership skills. Twenty-three elementary, middle level and high school teachers from across the state were actively engaged in the week-long course. (posted September 2013)


George Ashline, professor and chair of mathematics, was again this year a faculty consultant at the 2012 Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus Readings, held June 8-16 in Kansas City. Representing various universities, colleges, and high schools from around the world, faculty consultants graded the free response portions of over 360,000 AP Calculus exams during the week-long reading. George served as a table leader at the reading, helping to facilitate the assessment work of a group of fourteen readers.

George Ashline, professor and chair of mathematics, on May 15, 2011 presented "Correlation Properties and Applications" to several high school mathematics classes at Bellows Free Academy High School in Fairfax, VT. Through several activities, George led investigations by students of the definition and properties of the correlation coefficient and lines of best fit for pairs of quantitative variables. This presentation was sponsored by the Vermont State Mathematics Coalition's "Expanding Horizons Program," through which college and university faculty are invited to give presentations and visit classrooms across the state of Vermont. Also, with several co-authors, George recently had an article accepted for publication as one chapter of the current NCTM yearbook. Here are the details of the publication: "Closing the Achievement Gap: Systemic Collaboration for Equity in Mathematics," (with Marny Frantz, Kendra Gorton, Sandy Hepp, and Stephanie Ratmeyer), In J. Bay-Williams and W. Speer (Eds.), Professional Collaborations in Mathematics Teaching and Learning: Seeking Success for All, NCTM 74th Yearbook, NCTM: Reston, VA (2012) 31-45. Also, George and Dave Landers, Instructor of Psychology, presented in an "Approaches to Learning with Tegrity" showcase November 29, 2011 at the campus Technology Center. Also, their presentations along with their students were recorded (via Tegrity, naturally) with the intent of making the recording available to the community via a Web site link thanks to the work of Jim Millard, senior instructional technologist. Over lunch, Dave and George and some of their students held a discussion of their experiences using Tegrity in a classroom setting, and how this technology tool has enriched classroom pedagogy and supported student learning. Dave and his students talked about peer and self-review in Sports Psychology, as well as how Tegrity is used for observation in Theory of Psychology. George uses Tegrity, clickers, and the Smartboard to help his students understand, apply, and review mathematical concepts in such classes as Calculus and Linear Algebra. Examples of successful Tegrity captures and some features of this technology were shared.

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