Faculty Profile

Media Studies and Digital Arts Faculty

David Mindich, PhD

Professor of Media Studies, Journalism & Digital Arts

Ph.D., M.A. American Studies, New York University
B.A., Brandeis University

I am a professor of the Media Studies, Journalism & Digital Arts. I have been at Saint Michael's College since 1996. Before coming to Saint Michael's, I was an assignment editor for CNN. Along with my two books, I have written articles for the Wall Street Journal, New York Magazine, The Chronicle of Higher Education, Wilson Quarterly, and other publications.

Publications:

Just the Facts: How "Objectivity" Came to Define American Journalism

Tuned Out: Why Americans Under 40 Don't Follow the News (Oxford University Press, 2005), a book Walter Cronkite called "very important....a handbook for the desperately needed attempt to inspire in the young generation a curiosity that generates the news habit." Since its publication, I have given talks about young people and news to media groups (including the New York Times and USA Today) and at schools around the country.

The Mediated World, Forthcoming, Oxford University Press.

I founded Jhistory, an Internet group for journalism historians, in 1994. In 1998-1999, I was head of the History Division of the AEJMC.

In 2002, the AEJMC awarded me the Krieghbaum Under-40 Award for Outstanding Achievement in Research, Teaching and Public Service.  In 2006, CASE and the Carnegie Foundation named me the Vermont Professor of the Year. In 2011, the New England Newspaper and Press Association gave me its first-ever "Journalism Educator of the Year Award."

David Mindich, professor of media studies, journalism and digital arts, was to speak at Boston College High School in Boston, MA on Thursday, April 18, on "How do we prepare students in the midst of a media revolution? Thoughts from a Saint Michael's Journalism Professor" – an event chiefly for alumni, current parents, friends, and prospective students in the Boston area.


David Mindich, professor of media studies, journalism and digital arts, on November 5 delivered the keynote for the third annual Public Service Week at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. His talk, "Living an Engaged Life: How Young People Can Assert Their Political Power and Take Control of Our Democracy," was the signature event of a week of activities ranging from a blood drive to a campus-wide volunteer event to a public-service-career fair. For the talk, David drew on his book Tuned Out: Why Americans Under 40 Don't Follow the News. Old Dominion's Public Service Week was developed by ODU's Department of Urban Studies and Public Administration in the College of Business and Public Administration as a response to President Barack Obama's 2009 "call to service." While in Norfolk, David also was featured guest on the lunch hour call-in talk show Hearsay with host Cathy Lewis on the Hampton Roads public radio station WHRV-FM. He also contributed to the election night online blog of the Burlington Free Press.


David Mindich, professor of the Department of Media Studies, Journalism and Digital Arts, was honored with the top annual award of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC). The Presidential Award was presented to Professor Mindich at the annual meeting of the AEJMC held in Chicago, August 10-13.

AEJMC president, Linda Steiner, presented David Mindich with the AEJMC Presidential Award, "for outstanding contributions and dedication to the association." Steiner thanked Mindich for chairing the association’s Strategic Plan Committee and cited Mindich's accomplishments, including his three books: Just the Facts: How "Objectivity" Came to Define American Journalism (NYU Press, 1998), Tuned Out: Why American's Under 40 Don't Follow the News (Oxford, 2005), and the Mediated World  (Oxford, forthcoming), and for his founding of Jhistory, the listserv for journalism historians, in 1994.

Walter Cronkite described Tuned Out as "very important....a handbook for the desperately needed attempt to inspire in the young generation a curiosity that generates the news habit." Professor Mindich earned a doctorate in American Studies from New York University. He is a resident of Burlington.

In 2002, the AEJMC awarded Professor Mindich the Krieghbaum Under-40 Award for Outstanding Achievement in Research, Teaching and Public Service.  In 2006, CASE and the Carnegie Foundation named him the Vermont Professor of the Year. In 2011, the New England Newspaper and Press Association gave him its first-ever "Journalism Educator of the Year Award."

AEJMC

The August 2012 AEJMC meeting, attended by 2,467 professionals, kicked off a celebration of their 100 years as an association. As described on their website: The Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC) is a nonprofit, educational association of journalism and mass communication educators, students and media professionals. The Association's mission is to promote the highest possible standards for journalism and mass communication education, to cultivate the widest possible range of communication research, to encourage the implementation of a multi-cultural society in the classroom and curriculum, and to defend and maintain freedom of communication in an effort to achieve better professional practice and a better informed public.

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