Course Catalog

Accelerated Summer College students will take two of the courses below, each course is worth four credits. Students should be advised that credits earned at Saint Michael's College are transferable at the discretion of the receiving institution.

Keep in mind that these courses are rigorous. Outside of face-to-face class time, you will also be working independently through online coursework and class projects. When assessing your time commitments, please keep above in mind.

Accelerated Summer College Catalog - Blended/Residential running May 21-June 29, 2018 (with orientation day Sunday, May 20)


Accounting

AC 141 Financial Accounting - Professor Steve Doyon
Introduces accounting principles and practices applicable to the preparation and analysis of financial statements of a business organization. Major topics include the accounting cycle, classification of elements of financial statements (assets, liabilities, equity), measurement of income, and preparation and analysis of financial statements.

AC 143 Managerial Accounting - Professor Tom VanDzura
Covers the preparation and use of accounting information to support managerial planning, control and decision making. Introduces cost classification and behavior concepts, cost-volume-profit analysis, the use of budgets, cost-control systems, standard costs, variance analysis, cost-based decision making, and cash flows.


Anthropology 

AN 109 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology - Professor Adrie Kusserow
An introduction to the principles and processes of cultural anthropology. The course not only provides students with basic insights into facts and theories, but also, most importantly, the anthropological attitude of a commitment to understanding  and tolerating other cultural traditions.

For Saint Michael's College students, this course satisfies the Global Issues OR Social and Institutional requirement.


Art     

AR 214 Animation & Motion Graphics - Professor Gordon Glover
This course introduces the aesthetic & technical demands of animation, motion graphics, and video compositing. It covers techniques including compositing images, image manipulation, motion graphics, animation and software navigation. In considering the aesthetic role of animation & motion graphics, students discern when where and how to use motion elements in design. Students work with video, photography, animation, vector, bitmap, digitally and traditionally generated images to synthesize and integrate using timeline-based applications to create professional-quality motion graphics compositions.

For Saint Michael's College students, this course satisfies the Artistic Experiencerequirement.


Biology

BI 108 Topics: Human Nutrition - Professor Jim Willard
An intensive lab science course for non-science majors that will consider the components of human diets, how such components are processed by the human body, and how nutrition affects human health throughout the life cycle. Topics include the physiological requirements for and chemistry of the main nutrients: carbohydrates, proteins, lipid, minerals and vitamins.

For Saint Michael's College students, this course satisfies the Scientific Reasoning requirement.

BI 207 Human Anatomy and Physiology 1 Professor Paul Constantino
Students will study the structures of the vertebrate body and will also learn how vertebrate structure has been modified over evolutionary time. The primary focus will be on mammalian, including human anatomy.

For Saint Michael's College students, this course will require a pre-requisite of BI 151 and BI 153.


Business Administration

BU 111 Management Information Systems - Professor Karen Popovich
Introduces students to the role of information technology and information systems in formal organizations. Includes the study of the use of information technology to build efficient and effective information systems. Focuses on development of information systems that provide meaningful information for management decision making. This course will have a project, focused on Excel, to analyze and organize data that in turn is used to inform decision-making for a real organization.


Economics

EC 101 Principles of Macroeconomics - Professor Reza Ramazani
This course is an introduction to the macroeconomic approach to economic analysis. Students learn how to measure and interpret: Gross Domestic Product (GDP), unemployment and price levels through a discussion of fundamental economic concepts and the role of markets. We examine macroeconomic instability through a study of causes and policy prescriptions from two major opposing schools of thought: Classical and Keynesian. We continue with a study of money, interest rates and the Federal Reserve. Current economic problems and policy debates including economic controversies on the role of international trade, monetary and fiscal policy, the deficit, economic growth, and productivity are also highlighted.

For Saint Michael's College students, this course satisfies the Social and Institutional requirement.


Education

ED 300 Olympics, Great Depression, War, and Art Deco: Bringing 1936 Alive Teaching Social Studies and the Arts - Professor Jonathan Silverman
Students will explore effective and creative ways to create interdisciplinary curriculum for educational enviornments. Literature, visual culture, performances, theoretical essays, primary sources, and our own experiences are the texts to bridge understanding of history with social, enviornmental, and aesthetic issues of today. Students will learn to construct a curriculum unit and teach lessons that promote imagination and reflection within culturally responsive communities where all students' learning needs are addressed.

For Saint Michael's College students, this course satisfies the Global Issues requirement.


English

EN 110 Literature of the American Dream - Professor Robert Niemi
This course provides an introduction to literary studies through the lens of a particular topic. It aims to make students more aware of their aesthetic experience through extensive reading of primary texts, discussion of interpretive strategies, and writing about the process of paying attention to literature and life.

For Saint Michael's College students, this course satisfies the Literary Studies requirement.


Enviornmental Studies

ES 107 Enviornmental Science* - Professor David Heroux
This course is a science-based investigation of the Earth as a system, with application to understanding many issues in contemporary environmental policy. Science is an attempt to discover how nature works. Through careful observation, measurements, experimentation, and modeling, students will explore issues in contemporary environmental science. These include climate change, biodiversity, deforestation, ecosystem structure and function, population, biogeochemical cycling, energy, as well as investigations of environmental problems, their causes, and solutions. 

For Saint Michael's College students, this course satisfies the Scientific Reasoning requirement.

*This course meets face-to-face from May 14-17 and online from May 18-June 8.


Mathematics

MA 130 Elements of Calculus - Professor Krisan Geary
A one-semester survey of calculus. Topics include limits, derivatives and the integral, with emphasis on applications in the life sciences and finance. Note that the prerequisite for MA160 is MA150, so additional preparation (e.g. formal limits and more in-depth trigonometry) is strongly recommended for MA130 students who subsequently decide to petition into MA160..

For Saint Michael's College students, this course satisfies the Quantitative Reasoningrequirement.


Media Studies and Digital Arts

MJD 215 Wilderness Photography ­- Professor Jerry Swope
This digital-based photography course will explore the methods and artistry of outdoor, adventure photography and multimedia storytelling. Through the analysis of historical and contemporary work, students will develop the technical skills and creative approaches necessary for documenting recreational and adventure sports pursued in the natural world. Additionally, in the experiential learning component of this class, students will be responsible for creating multimedia marketing presentations for Vermont Department of Tourism and Marketing. By the end of the class, students will be proficient in the following Adobe programs: Photoshop, Audition and Premiere.

For Saint Michael's College students, this course satisfies the Experiential Learningrequirement.


Philosophy

PH 103 Pursuing Wisdon - Professor Crystal L'Hote
The course both shows the student the nature and value of philosophical inquiry, using only primary texts such as Plato's dialogues and other major philosophical writings, and, at the same time, invites the student to become personally philosophical by developing their own way of seeing the meaning and value of things. One way of coming to see how deeply human and profoundly personal the questions of meaning and value examined in philosophy are is by coming to understand how they would remain unanswered even if some day we were able to answer all the questions of the sciences.

For Saint Michael's College students, this course satisfies the Philosophical Questionsrequirement.


Political Science

PO 120 Introduction to American National Politics - Professor Shefali Misra
A general introduction to the structure and processes that define American politics on the national level.

For Saint Michael's College students, this course satisfies the Social and Institutional requirement.


Psychology

PS 252 Child Development - Professor Renee Carrico
An introduction to the basic principles of human growth and development from the prenatal period through middle childhood. Topics include physical, perceptual, cognitive, emotional, and language development. The hereditary, psychological, and environmental influences on development will be considered, along with a variety of theoretical and experimental approaches to studying development. 


Religious Studies

RS 120 Christianity: Past and Present - Professor Ray Patterson
A survey of Christianity, its origins and major periods in its historical development, the character of its faith in God and in the person of Jesus Christ, and theological and ethical perspectives it offers on contemporary issues of moral choice and human community. 

For Saint Michael's College students, this course satisfies the Christian Traditions requirement.
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The course both shows the student the nature and value of philosophical inquiry, using only primary texts such as Plato's dialogues and other major philosophical writings, and, at the same time, invites the student to become personally philosophical by developing their own way of seeing the meaning and value of things. One way of coming to see how deeply human and profoundly personal the questions of meaning and value examined in philosophy are is by coming to understand how they would remain unanswered even if some day we were able to answer all the questions of the sciences.
The course both shows the student the nature and value of philosophical inquiry, using only primary texts such as Plato's dialogues and other major philosophical writings, and, at the same time, invites the student to become personally philosophical by developing their own way of seeing the meaning and value of things. One way of coming to see how deeply human and profoundly personal the questions of meaning and value examined in philosophy are is by coming to understand how they would remain unanswered even if some day we were able to answer all the questions of the sciences.
The course both shows the student the nature and value of philosophical inquiry, using only primary texts such as Plato's dialogues and other major philosophical writings, and, at the same time, invites the student to become personally philosophical by developing their own way of seeing the meaning and value of things. One way of coming to see how deeply human and profoundly personal the questions of meaning and value examined in philosophy are is by coming to understand how they would remain unanswered even if some day we were able to answer all the questions of the sciences.
The course both shows the student the nature and value of philosophical inquiry, using only primary texts such as Plato's dialogues and other major philosophical writings, and, at the same time, invites the student to become personally philosophical by developing their own way of seeing the meaning and value of things. One way of coming to see how deeply human and profoundly personal the questions of meaning and value examined in philosophy are is by coming to understand how they would remain unanswered even if some day we were able to answer all the questions of the sciences.

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