Academics

Course Catalog: Summer Session 1

Accelerated Summer College students can take up to two of the courses below, each course is worth four credits. Students should be advised that credits earned at Saint Michael's College are transferable at the discretion of the receiving institution.

Accelerated Summer College Catalog - Summer Session 1:  May 20 - June 28, 2019


Accounting

AC 141 Financial Accounting (hybrid) Professor Steve Doyon
Introduces accounting principles and practices applicable to the preparation and analysis of financial statements of a business organization. Major topics include the accounting cycle, classification of elements of financial statements (assets, liabilities, equity), measurement of income, and preparation and analysis of financial statements.


Anthropology

AN 109 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (hybrid) Professor Patricia Delaney

An introduction to the principles and processes of cultural anthropology. The course not only provides students with basic insights into facts and theories, but also, most importantly, the anthropological attitude of a commitment to understanding and tolerating other cultural traditions.

For Saint Michael's College students:

LSC: Global Issues OR Social and Institutional

CORE: History and Society AND Engaging Diverse Identities


Art

AR 382 Topics: Wood Furniture Design and Construction (face-to-face) Professor Brian Collier
This course is designed as an introduction to design principals and fine woodworking techniques relevant to the production of custom-made wood furniture. Over the course of the semester, each student will design and build three wood projects. Each assignment is intended to teach a progression of skills in the fundamentals of design, including design with the 3D modelling program SketchUp, and the safe use of a wide range of woodworking tools and machinery to produce a joinery mallet, a box and a small table or stool.

For Saint Michael's College students:

LSC: Artistic Experience 

CORE: Literature and the Arts


Biology

BI 108 Topics: Human Nutrition (hybrid) - Professor Jim Willard
This lecture and laboratory course will emphasize scientific modes of inquiry through the study of topics pertaining to the organismal level of biological organization. Examples of specific topics that may be explored in a given semester are: human biology; animal behavior; embryology of plants and animals; physiological responses of plants and animals to the environment; the biology of a particular group of organisms, for example, plants, invertebrates, microorganisms, and human parasites.

For Saint Michael's College students:

LSC: Scientific Reasoning

CORE: Scientific Inquiry

 

BI 153 Introduction to Cell Biology and Genetics (hybrid) - Professor Ruth Fabian-Fine

Introduces the disciplines of cellular biology, genetics, and molecular biology. Our approach is problem- and inquiry-based. Lectures, case studies, and discussions present biological concepts relevant to real world problems. Labs promote hypothesis testing and experimental design. Students develop proficiency with scientific reasoning and learn the importance of biological principles in the natural world.

For Saint Michael's College students:

LSC: Scientific Reasoning

CORE: Scientific Inquiry 

 

BI 207 Human Anatomy and Physiology (online) - Professor Paul Constantino 

Students will study the structures of the vertebrate body and will also learn how vertebrate structure has been modified over evolutionary time. The primary focus will be on mammalian, including human, anatomy.


Business Administration

BU 215 Marketing (online) - Professor Robert Letovsky 

This course will provide a review of the fundamental topics in marketing management, and expose the student to various analytical and decision making tools currently used by marketing managers. The course will focus on the various elements of the marketing mix, and on how the marketing manager must control and integrate each of them to achieve competitive advantage.


Economics

EC 101 Principles of Macroeconomics (hybrid) - Professor Reza Ramazani
This course is an introduction to the macroeconomic approach to economic analysis. Students learn how to measure and interpret: Gross Domestic Product (GDP), unemployment and price levels through a discussion of fundamental economic concepts and the role of markets. We examine macroeconomic instability through a study of causes and policy prescriptions from two major opposing schools of thought: Classical and Keynesian. We continue with a study of money, interest rates and the Federal Reserve. Current economic problems and policy debates including economic controversies on the role of international trade, monetary and fiscal policy, the deficit, economic growth, and productivity are also highlighted.

For Saint Michael's College students:

LSC: Social and Institutional 


English

EN 110 Literature of the American Dream (online) Professor Robert Niemi

This course provides a topic-based approach to literary studies. It aims to make students more aware of their aesthetic experience through extensive reading of primary texts, discussion of interpretive strategies, and writing about the process of paying attention to literature and life.

For Saint Michael's College students:

LSC: Literary Studies

CORE: Literature and the Arts


Environmental Studies

ES 107 Environmental Science (hybrid*) -  Professor David Heroux
This course is a science-based investigation of the Earth as a system, with application to understanding many issues in contemporary environmental policy. Science is an attempt to discover how nature works. Through careful observation, measurements, experimentation, and modeling, students will explore issues in contemporary environmental science. These include climate change, biodiversity, deforestation, ecosystem structure and function, population, biogeochemical cycling, energy, as well as investigations of environmental problems, their causes, and solutions. 

*This course will officially start on 05/20/19 and run face-to-face from 9 am to 1 pm through 05/23/19.  After those three days, the class will continue as an online only course through the end of ASC session 1.

For Saint Michael's College students:

LSC: Scientific Reasoning

CORE: Scientific Inquiry 


Interdisciplinary

ID 498 Internship Practicum (online) - Professor Paul Olsen
The online Internship is designed to support the internship site experience and assist with the integration of learning from the theoretical to the practical by providing a means of reflection and learning. This course offers students the opportunity to share their internship experiences and concerns in a team setting and includes opportunities to develop personal and professional skills. Assignments and online discussions will be related to the internship experience.


Media Studies and Digital Arts

MJD 215 Photography and Tourism (hybrid) ­- Professor Jerry Swope
This digital-based photography course will explore the methods and artistry of outdoor and tourism photography. Through the analysis of historical and contemporary work, students will develop the technical skills and creative approaches necessary for documenting recreational, outdoor, and tourism related activities pursued in the state of Vermont.  Additionally, in the experiential learning component of this class, students will be responsible for creating multimedia marketing presentations for Vermont Department of Tourism and Marketing. By the end of the class, students will be proficient in the following Adobe programs: Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign.


Philosophy

PH 103 Introduction to Philosophy (hybrid) Professor Patrick Standen
The course both shows the student the nature and value of philosophical inquiry, using only primary texts such as Plato's dialogues and other major philosophical writings, and, at the same time, invites the student to become personally philosophical by developing their own way of seeing the meaning and value of things. One way of coming to see how deeply human and profoundly personal the questions of meaning and value examined in philosophy are is by coming to understand how they would remain unanswered even if some day we were able to answer all the questions of the sciences.

For Saint Michael's College students:

LSC or CORE: Philosophical Questions


Political Science

PO 261 European Political Thought (hybrid)Professor Shefali Misra
This course traces the main developments in European political thought from the break-up of the feudal system until the mid-nineteenth century. It involves a close, critical reading of some of the major original works of prominent political thinkers from Hobbes through Marx, locating their thought in its social and political context.

For Saint Michael's College students:

CORE: History and Society


Psychology

PS 110 Lifespan Development (online) Professor Melissa Vanderkaay Tomasulo 
Students will gain understanding of the development of human individuals through physical, cognitive, and socioemotional components from conception to death.  Theoretical and experimental approaches will be examined, and emphasis will be placed on applying these principles to relationships and situations across one’s lifespan.  The nature-nature debate will also be addressed.

 

PS 252 Child Development (hybrid)Professor Renee Carrico
This course traces the main developments in European political thought from the break-up of the feudal system until the mid-nineteenth century. It involves a close, critical reading of some of the major original works of prominent political thinkers from Hobbes through Marx, locating their thought in its social and political context.


Statistics

ST 120 Elementary Statistics (online) - Professor Warren Sides
An introduction to the field of psychology, its methods, major perspectives, theories, and area specialties, with emphasis on the normal adult human being. The course explores basic psychological areas such as biopsychology, perception, learning, motivation, developmental, personality, social, abnormal, and therapies.

 

For Saint Michael's College students:

LSC or CORE: Quantitative Reasoning

 

 
The course both shows the student the nature and value of philosophical inquiry, using only primary texts such as Plato's dialogues and other major philosophical writings, and, at the same time, invites the student to become personally philosophical by developing their own way of seeing the meaning and value of things. One way of coming to see how deeply human and profoundly personal the questions of meaning and value examined in philosophy are is by coming to understand how they would remain unanswered even if some day we were able to answer all the questions of the sciences.
The course both shows the student the nature and value of philosophical inquiry, using only primary texts such as Plato's dialogues and other major philosophical writings, and, at the same time, invites the student to become personally philosophical by developing their own way of seeing the meaning and value of things. One way of coming to see how deeply human and profoundly personal the questions of meaning and value examined in philosophy are is by coming to understand how they would remain unanswered even if some day we were able to answer all the questions of the sciences.
The course both shows the student the nature and value of philosophical inquiry, using only primary texts such as Plato's dialogues and other major philosophical writings, and, at the same time, invites the student to become personally philosophical by developing their own way of seeing the meaning and value of things. One way of coming to see how deeply human and profoundly personal the questions of meaning and value examined in philosophy are is by coming to understand how they would remain unanswered even if some day we were able to answer all the questions of the sciences.
The course both shows the student the nature and value of philosophical inquiry, using only primary texts such as Plato's dialogues and other major philosophical writings, and, at the same time, invites the student to become personally philosophical by developing their own way of seeing the meaning and value of things. One way of coming to see how deeply human and profoundly personal the questions of meaning and value examined in philosophy are is by coming to understand how they would remain unanswered even if some day we were able to answer all the questions of the sciences.

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