Global Eyes 2016

Category: City Life

new shanghai

Category Winner

"New Shanghai" by Samuel Fogg
China | February 2015

Shanghai, my host city for seven months and a city of 24 million people, holds some of the world’s tallest buildings. From the 94th floor of its World Financial Center one has a view of the rapid progress taking place. Yet, this area’s futuristic appearance and extreme levels of wealth contrast sharply with much of the rest of the city, causing locals to refer to it as a separate city in itself.

bubble bliss

"Bubble Bliss" by Meaghan Glendon
Italy | April 2015

While living in Florence, I found myself craving green grass, trees, and missing the hills of Vermont more than I ever thought I would. In cities, green spaces can be hard to find and throughout Florence there are piazza’s, which are open spaces like a town square. These places are where children go to play and hang out. In America we are told to stay away from strangers but it is different in other countries. The man blowing the bubbles is a stranger, but there is no sense of danger or fear. Instead, bystanders look on smiling and laughing at how much fun the children are having running and trying to catch the floating bubbles. It is a joyous occasion.

lords of the streets

"Lords of the Streets" by Briana Brady
Morocco | February 2015

In one of my first emails home, I wrote my family that “there are cats everywhere in Morocco. Everywhere.” In the Rabat Medina, as well as in every other city I visited, hundreds of unclaimed cats wander the maze of tiled alleys. Sometimes, as I walked home before evening fell and the call to prayer marked the setting of the sun, I would sometimes see the vendors on the market street putting out left over meat or fish for the cats. In a way, the cats were simply part of the city: hanging around waiting for their evening scraps, running through the legs of shoppers in the Souk, or simply curling up for a nap in the piles of neighborhood garbage that formed on the sides of the streets.


Category: Creative/Artistic

lights remain

Category Winner

"The Lights Remain" by Kaylee Sullivan
Denmark | May 2015

Not often do you wait an hour to walk into a room just to stand there for 60 seconds before exiting. This was one of those times. Once stepping into artist Yayoi Kusama’s exhibit in Denmark’s Louisiana of Modern Art, one is surrounded by mirror covered walls, creating a 360 degree experience. As I stood in the middle of this room, watching the changing colors, shapes, and sizes of the lights, I realized the true beauty of light; I realized light will always shine on my study abroad experience.

25 seconds

"25 Seconds" by Alexander Shaw
South Africa | November 2015

After nightfall many backpackers along the South African coast will have fires and invite those living amongst them to sing, dance and spin fire. This unedited image captures the movement of a fire spinner over the course of a 25 second exposure.

tan cat blue city

"Tan Cat, Blue City" by Kathryn Miyahira
Morocco | March 2015

Chefchaouen is known as the City of Blue. The streets and houses glow in the mountains, and cats roam the streets freely. In a small corridor that connected one street to another sat this cat. Calm, poised, and looking straight at the camera, as if it were ready for its time to shine.


Category: Culture Most Distinct from SMC

lights remain

Category Winner

"Harmonized Chaos" by Natalie Ledue
Vietnam | January 2015

I stood at the busy Hanoi intersection, building up the courage to cross the oncoming traffic that had no intention of stopping for the pedestrians. I would then take this photo, capturing the commotion around me: cars without lanes, motorbikes weaving around the people in their way, apartments stacked in an unorganized fashion, tangled power lines, and sales men and women haggling their next customer. I found that the people of Hanoi lived public lives along the busy streets, as I observed them eat, work, bathe, even clip their toenails. I can still hear the honking and shouting, the perfectly organized chaos. With a mist to cool the humidity, getting lost deep in the heart of Hanoi was a complete juxtaposition to the quiet Vermont life and clear blue skies I had left behind—but an experience that was empowering and intriguing.

paddles only

The People's Choice Award

"Paddles Only" by Marisa Rubino
Cuba | January 2016

Playa Larga is a community filled with happiness and gratitude, but absent of modern technology. While gathering gear at the dive shop one day, I noticed that not a single boat in the bay had a motor. There were no pontoon boats, speed boats, or big inflatable tubes roped on to the backs. Most importantly, there were no industrial fishing boats. There were only simple wooden boats that required manual labor to move, and more manual labor to fish. I thought about the motorized boats that pull me and my friends around while we attempt various water sports, and how the essence of a boat gliding against the water was lost. We Americans have the technology, but the Cubans have the beauty.

natural floating

"Natural Floating" by Emma Cannon
Peru | September 2015

Lake Titicaca is home to the Uros people, a community that builds their homes, boats, and even the islands they live on out of the Totora reeds that grow in shallow waters at the edges of the lake. This man, the president of a group that lives on one such island, told me that it takes over a month to build the kind of boat he is using. Although tourism is a big part of their livelihood today, the Uros still sustain themselves in large part by hunting, fishing, and collecting the Totora reed and other natural materials.


Category: Landscape

structuralism

Category Winner

"Structuralism" by Karleen Richardson
Italy | April 2015

Cinque Terre, which translates as “Five Lands,” is composed of five hillside villages perched above the Italian Riviera: Monterosso al Mare, Vernazza, Corniglia, Manarola, and Riomaggiore. Together they constitute a national park and are recognized as a UNESCO World Heritage site. This photograph depicts the town of Corniglia and was taken from an adjacent hillside.

atop the teapot

"Atop the Teapot" by Samuel Fogg
Taiwan | July 2015

Teapot Mountain, named for its resemblance to the vessel, offers stunning views of the Pacific Ocean and former goldmining towns once held by the Japanese. A rough stone trail passes by bright red pavilions as it winds its way to the top. This photo, taken at sunset, was well worth the climb and made for one of my best memories of exploring the Taiwan’s countryside.

through the eyes of a bird

"A Bridge to the Past" by Parker Thomas
Italy | December 2015

In literal translation, il Ponte Vecchio means “Old-Bridge”, spanning generations, wars, and cultures. As the only bridge to survive World War II, if you ask a Florentine why it still stands they will tell you that Hitler deemed it too beautiful to destroy. Now occupied by gold merchants, the bridge serves as a symbol of cross-cultural interaction and is steeped in Florentine history. The beauty of the bridge lies within the generations passed who have walked the same uneven street countless times before, seeing their reflection in the Arno River as the city of Firenze spins around them.

painted with water

"Painted with Water" by Paul Detzer
Australia | March 2015

This river flows over the rocks and smashes into the ground: the sound was almost deafening. I took several pictures at varying shutter speeds, and found nothing could capture the essence of the moment. With no tripod, I set the camera down atop a railing and set it to a fifteenth of a second and held it steady. When I looked in the screen after the shot was complete, what I saw was as close to reality as I could hope to record: the stream flowing into the rocks, the stunningly vibrant green, and the trees that looked as old as time itself.


Category: Nature and the Environment

tag along

Category Winner

"Tag Along" by Ryder Schumacher
Iceland | March 2015

While the sun split the clouds and the inspective Icelandic horse stood by, I asked the farmer whether it was acceptable to approach his herd. He agreed wholeheartedly, granting me access to the finest grazing site known to horse. She turned away as I neared, then turned back around as if asking me to stay longer. I would have if I’d had a mane like hers to keep me warm.

preserving the canary

"Preserving the Canary in the Cave: Undisturbed Coral" by Rhianna Jones
Cuba | January 2016

It is said that the degradation of coral reefs is the metaphorical canary in the mine and that it is the signal that the Earth is in a lot of trouble. The coral reef around Cuba is the second largest in the world. Until recently tourism was low so the coral reef was untouched and in pristine conditions. If this coral reef begins to lose its luster it is not only another natural beauty lost, but also a sign of a much larger problem.

are you echidna me

"Are You Echidna Me?" by Victoria Hellwig
Australia | March 2015

My friends and I spotted this cute little mammal on our walk through an old military camp on an island outside of Sydney. Featured on the 5-cent coin of Australian currency, the echidna is one of the last monotremes, along with the platypus, to exist on the planet. Here, he (or she) forages for insects in the cracks of these tombs, with the help of his (or her) dainty, eerily human-like hands. I was mesmerized by the contrast between the quills and underbelly, and grateful that he (or she) allowed me to get so close to snap this photo - not close enough to determine a gender, but close enough to capture one of the most precious natural moments on my Australian adventure.


Category: People and the Human Spirit

enamored shepherd

Category Winner / The Barry Krikstone Best of Show Award

"Enamored Shepherd" by Anna Ste. Marie
India | June 2015

As the sun began to set behind base camp, a clamoring herd of goats spilled down a distant mountainside. They settled in a stone structure just below our tents. Curiosity soon found us approaching two elderly shepherds. The man stood aside but the woman invited us into the barn and introduced us to the newest member of her herd, born just a few hours prior. While teaching the kid to nurse, uncontainable joy poured out of her smile; the fresh life reawakens the archaic Himalayan desert.

chinggis khaan

"A Son of Chinggis Khaan (Ghengis Khan)" by Andie Gemme
Mongolia

This is a photo of my 3-year-old host brother, Munkherdene. He is the first child of my parents Ariunaa and Batbaatar, both nomadic herders born and raised on the wild and remote landscape that is the Mongolian countryside. Faced with long, harsh winters, Mongolian herders live a life focused on their animals and keeping them alive and healthy. Moving anywhere from 4 to over 10 times per year to find good grass and water, herders and their children, like Munkherdene, live a life intimately linked to and dependent on their environment. With the climate and environment rapidly changing, the future of this ancient lifestyle is, at best, uncertain.

umbrellas and mausoleums

"Umbrellas and Mausoleums" by Samuel Fogg
China | February 2015

Despite the rain, thousands of visitors wielding umbrellas ascend the stairs toward the mausoleum above. Many take their time in old age pausing to catch glimpses of the sights below. All have come to pay their respects to the late “Father of China,” Dr. Sun Yat-sen. Dr. Sun Yat-sen played a leading role in unifying post-imperial China. Today he is still revered by many for his leadership prior to the formation of the Communist state.


Category: Society and Politics

mao zedong

Category Winner

"The Legacy of Mao Zedong" by Joseph Humes
China | May 2015

When he founded the People’s Republic of China in 1949, Mao Zedong envisioned a blossoming empire that was at the epicenter of the world’s economy and an archetype for sociopolitical success. Within the borders of the newly budding nation, Mao and the Communist Party slowly increased internal monitoring and underground surveillance of their citizens. Now, cities all over China are so flooded with street cameras and neatly dressed Communist Party guards that they mimic Orwellian police states.
In Tiananmen Square, one of the most notorious and culturally significant city squares in the world, surveillance is paramount. At the entrance to the Forbidden City, in front of the famous “Gate of Heavenly Peace,” Mao’s everlasting influence can be seen as he watches over the dozens of astute soldiers that protect the ancient royal palace. In the spirit of Mao, and his surveillance ideals that have been tactfully instilled in the contemporary Communist Party, it seemed fitting that this Party guard turned and looked into my lens just as I snapped a photo.

laundry day

"Laundry Day" by Meaghan Diffenderfer
Ghana | May 2015

Laundry day in Kopeyia had its challenges: our access to running water was limited to what could be held in a trash bin, and it was immediate that we had to be conscious of what we were using. However, it became a sort of meditation, one of the most still and quiet parts of our day. As the sun beat down on our necks, we scrubbed our clothes in sudsy water, rinsed them, and hung them to dry, with distant sounds of drumming and singing omnipresent.


Category: The Essence of Study Abroad

secmol song nook

Category Winner

"SECMOL Song Nook" by Anna Ste. Marie
India | June 2015

Pressed up against walls of books and potted succulents, we lounged in a sunny nook to escape the incessant wind that pelted us with a wall of dust and pebbles with every gust. Ladakhi friends joined us as we gravitated toward the guitars. We found common ground in songs by Michael Jackson, AC/DC, and Jason Mraz. As Nick began to strum one of his original songs, our new friend observed keenly and soon played along.

breaking barriers

"Breaking Barriers" by Michelle O'Donnell
Tanzania | May 2015

To me, the essence of study abroad is about not only observing a culture unlike our own but participating in it. Shannon, having already been to the Ilula Orphan Program (our hosts in Tanzania) settled right in and found ways to get to know the kids and have fun with them, despite not speaking a lot of Swahili. These girls, some shy, some outgoing, all with varying levels of spoken English, showed me what it truly means to reject the simple “single story” one could tell about them and see them as individuals with their own unique and complex past.

beauty is in the eye of the beholder

"Beauty is in the Eye of the Beholder" by Shandon Kelleher
Ireland | September 2015

This photo was taken walking through the city. The people in the photo are all study abroad students, and although they are together and sharing these experiences, everyone had a completely different adventure that only belonged to themselves.

out of the shadows

"Out of the Shadows" by Kathryn Miyahira
Italy | April 2015

There is nothing more frightening than the unknown. Studying abroad is the unknown. It is not knowing what the city you go to is like. It is not knowing what the food will be like. It is not knowing if you can handle being away from friends and family in a foreign place.
As I look at this photo now, I think about how abroad has changed myself and so many others. It forces you to get out of your comfort zone, it pushes you forward into the unknown. This photo, for me, means breaking out of what was my “norm” to experience the bright, colorful and different world that surrounded me.


Category: Best Written Caption

harmonized chaos

Category Winner

"Harmonized Chaos" by Natalie Ledue
Vietnam | January 2015

I stood at the busy Hanoi intersection, building up the courage to cross the oncoming traffic that had no intention of stopping for the pedestrians. I would then take this photo, capturing the commotion around me: cars without lanes, motorbikes weaving around the people in their way, apartments stacked in an unorganized fashion, tangled power lines, and sales men and women haggling their next customer. I found that the people of Hanoi lived public lives along the busy streets, as I observed them eat, work, bathe, even clip their toenails. I can still hear the honking and shouting, the perfectly organized chaos. With a mist to cool the humidity, getting lost deep in the heart of Hanoi was a complete juxtaposition to the quiet Vermont life and clear blue skies I had left behind—but an experience that was empowering and intriguing.

sand mandalas for days

"Sand Mandalas for Days" by Joshua Dickman
Australia | September 2015

One day after walking back from a class field trip along the beach I came across a beautiful, unfamiliar shell. I liked the shell and immediately envisioned how it would look on a necklace. As we came upon the end of the beach I began to notice intricate patterns of creativity appearing in the sand amongst the early spring evening sunshine. Then a figure emerged commanding a make-shift sand mandala tool, crafted by the skeleton of what appeared to be a broomstick. I was blown away by the beauty the beach wizard was manifesting, so much so that I felt inspired to pay him my respects. So I went up to him, and expressed my appreciation. Instinctively I reached in my pocket to hand him some currency but he reflexively refused my donation. However, I pulled out my beloved shell, a gift from the beach itself and he accepted it with gratitude.

clockwise

"Clockwise" by Anna Ste. Marie
India | June 2015

Hidden behind a row of trinket shops in Leh’s disorderly main bazaar lies the Chokhang Vihara Gompa, protected from the hue and cry of development and untouched by the dense blanket of construction dust. An elderly monk paces the grounds gently deterring snack vendors trickling in from the streets above. A gray bird perched on the scaffolding overhead watches as the monk spins a row of prayer wheels clockwise to gain wisdom and good karma. “Om ma ni padme hum,” he recites, training his mind to remain focused while his body is in transit.

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