Global Eyes 2017

Category: City Life

Communal Chaos

Category Winner

"Communal Chaos" by Lindsey Rogers
Vietnam | September 2016

Walking around the streets of Hanoi is like walking around the living rooms of the city’s residents. Women sell fruit right outside their homes. Barbers work right on the crowded city streets. The line between public and private is not well defined in Vietnam. When I first started exploring Hanoi, I felt overwhelmed by the commotion on the streets. The honking of motorbikes, the strange smells of street meat, and the hazy air left me in a state of sensory overload, aching for peace, quiet, and privacy. However, the more time I spent in the city, the more I appreciated the community in the streets. The people of Hanoi do not close the doors to their homes in the same way they do not close their lives and hearts to others.

The Circus

"The Circus" by Mackenzie Faber
England | April 2016

By April, I still hadn’t quite grown accustomed to living in a Jane Austen novel. Even while (barely) carrying bags of groceries after an hour at the gym and a full day of class, sweating a little under my tee-shirt, I often stopped in my tracks when I reached the Circus, a circular row of limestone homes right near where I lived at the top of the hill. In fact, the closer the end of my time in Bath was, the longer I stood. Perhaps it was the warmer spring air, with the tree that seemed as old as the Circus itself blossoming with pale pink flower petals fluttering under its shade and the choir of songbirds all around, or perhaps it was the creeping feeling of premature nostalgia. It was probably both. And so on my way home one April evening, glowing like the Circus in the fading glory of the daylight, I put my bags down for a moment, breathed in, and let my camera have a long look, too.

Make Street Art Not War

"Make (Street) Art, Not War" by Abigail Snarski
France | February 2016

Having just exited a vintage store in the fourth arrondissement in Paris, a bright streak of pink, so juxtaposed against the neutrally colored stone buildings that characterize the city, caught my eye. Curious, I got closer and found someone had written, “love,” “dream,” “hope,” and “peace” in black ink on the pink background. Not only did I find this street art unique and “artsy,” but I was so moved by these simple words—especially the last one, “peace”—because Paris was still mourning the loss of many of its citizens from the terrorist attack that past November. Although these motivational words are far from original, they meant so much more to me in the wake of such a heartbreaking tragedy.


Category: Creative/Artistic

Sails

Category Winner

"Sails" by Maggie Mae Whittemore
Australia | April 2016

When most people visit the Sydney Opera House they take their pictures from the outside, getting the full picture of the harbor, bridge and magnificent sails all in one. Not many people take pictures from the inside though. Getting this new perspective of the building made the Opera House’s magic come to life. Touring through a selected few of the 1,000 rooms and seeing those iconic sails from an unfamiliar viewpoint was a humbling experience for a tourist. Each of the over one million tiles was visible from close view and showed the amount of intricacy that was built into the landmark.

Beyond A Book

"Beyond A Book" by Tess Saburn
Cuba | March 2016

Presented here is a glimpse of Cuba, overflowing with culture from flags of country influence, to wine bottles, to the honoring of Che Guevara. Santiago de Cuba is saturated with culture, streaming from the people into my heart and soul. This picture holds so many images, so many ideas, perspectives, passions, questions, stories and tales. It would take a lifetime to delve into the depths of such wonderful people and beautiful culture, still holding onto the hope that Che brought to the people.

The Golden City

"The Golden City" by Matthew Nachatelo
Spain | October 2016

As the sun was beginning to rise over the city of Salamanca, a lone photographer wakes up early to capture the sunrise over the city. Taken in the Plaza Mayor, the main square of the city, the sun is captured illuminating the city in a way that has inspired the name “La Ciudad Dorada,” or the Golden City. The unique architecture of this city with its golden tint has drawn so many to her gates, but in this early morning only one man stood at the gates of Salamanca to take in all of her beauty. The silence of the early morning was peaceful and beautiful in itself, allowing one to enjoy the city as if it were your own.

The Path to Nirvana

"The Path to Nirvana" by Emily Higgins
Indonesia | April 2016

On the island of Java lies the largest Buddhist temple compound, Borobudur. This picture was taken from the steps of Amanjiwo looking straight at the great monument. As this man descends down the pathway, he walks towards Borobudur, towards enlightenment. When one walks towards Borobudur, it is a spiritual journey. When one reaches the top, it is believed you have reached Nirvana.


Category: Culture Most Distinct from SMC

Ngaben Ceremony

Category Winner

"Ngaben Ceremony" by Emily Higgins
Indonesia | February 2016

Within a month of being on the island of Bali, I attended two cremation ceremonies. We paraded around town wearing bright colors, playing music and the dead body wrapped in cloth and laid to rest in intricately made cremation towers, before finding our way to the towns recreational field, where the entire community met to watch the bodies burn. It was a beautiful celebration of life.

Travelling for Bread

"Travelling for Bread" by Marie Shepherd
India | January 2017

The population of Madurai accounts for 1 million people, not including any homeless who do not own a home or a piece of land in the city. In this photo, two men came into the big city from a rural farm with crops to sell at the local market, and they brought their dual ox cart as transportation. This ancient ox cart has been updated with miscellaneous pieces of twine, bolts, and even plastic to keep the structure intact as the integrity has worn with age. In the background are advertisements in the native language Tamil representing western women with fair skin and eyes, utterly unlike the dark Hindu women in sarees of South India. Upon examining the oxen, I recognized with regard to the large population in Madurai, it is nearly impossible to keep the animals properly nourished even living in more rural areas of South India. Transportation by dual ox cart is part of everyday life for these two men, who have traveled a significant distance away from their families in hopes of bringing home necessities to thrive. With the weight of these realizations, I felt compelled to walk into the busy Madurai street to capture this photo.

Amigo o Enemigo

"Amigo o Enemigo" by Angela Baldacci
Spain | September 2016

This image captures the intensity of the dynamic between man and bull. The bullfight represents two extremes of culture – it is one of the most celebrated and traditional spectacles in Spain, yet it is notorious for its gruesome violence and mistreatment of animals. The bullfight would most likely not be accepted by those in the SMC community but appreciating, understanding and respecting differences in values is one of the most enriching and rewarding aspects of studying abroad.


Category: Landscape

structuralism

Category Winner

"Whitby Abbey" by Rachel Coley
England | March 2016

Whitby Abbey is located on a hill overlooking the town of Whitby and the eastern coast of England. The abbey dates back to the 11th century, a time when it was home to a Benedictine monastery. It sits next to the famous “199 steps” that lead down to the coast. Both the steps and the abbey are featured in Bram Stoker’s Dracula as the first site of Dracula’s arrival in England.

Spirit in the Sky

The People's Choice Award

"Spirit in the Sky" by Dana Scheffler
Bhutan | September 2016

September 14, 2016 marks the day that one of the greatest souls left this earth. When the news had reached me on the other side of the world that I lost one of my dearest friends, Jerry, I became utterly lost and confused with a endless knot of emotions especially being so far away from my St. Mikes family. Knowing I had to do something to honor his spirit, I embarked on one of the most challenging hikes both physically and emotionally for me. Something about climbing to the highest peak in proximity (elevation: 13,580 ft) brought me some solitude. I climbed with the thought that the higher I got the closer I would get to him. After saying a few words and singing a few of his favorite songs (mainly Bright Eyes and Elliot Smith), I burned some incense and set up these prayer flags which were blessed the previous day by a local Tibetan Monk. Prayer flags are often set up in Buddhist tradition to honor those who have passed. The flags are inscribed with auspicious and sacred symbols and it is believed every time the wind blows the prayers and blessings become activated. The seven mala beads hanging from flags represent Jerry and his wonderful soul and spirit that is still within all of us today because even though he has left us physically he has by no means left us emotionally. His flags now face the north western peaks of the Himalayas along with the tallest unclimbed peak in the world, Gangkhar Puensum. Love you Jer and hope you enjoy the view you deserve from up there.

Hillside

"Hillside" by Rachel Proctor
Scotland | April 2016

It was a beautiful day in Stirling, Scotland and since seeing the sun is a rarity in winter, we decided to take advantage of this and go for a sunset hike up Dumyat Hill. It is located within 5 minutes of the University of Stirling where I attended while studying abroad in Scotland. It is a steep, though quick rewarding hike once you reach the top. The sun was just setting in the distance as we reached the halfway point in the hike and I turned and saw these sheep grazing on the side of the hill. This picture describes perfectly one of the views I will always remember when I think about my time studying abroad here, with the sheep on the Scottish hillside overlooking the historic Wallace monument.


Category: Nature

Born to be WILD

Category Winner

"Born to be WILD" by Micalea Leaska
Tanzania | December 2016

We were all born to be free, we were all born to be wild. This is not something taught to us, this is an instinct within us. Never lose the power you hold to be free. This leopard expressed his power and dominance when he was woken up from sleeping in his tree. Every muscle in his body was focused on the matter at hand. We awe at the beauty of these powerful creatures as we should, but it is a wordless experience to be looking up to an animal so powerful and yet being submissive to give your upmost respect. Leopards should be respected and honored for being one of the most powerful and fierce of animals, but never use this gift against them. They were born to be wild, but it is us humans who think we can point a weapon and take this instinct from an animal.

Tree Goats

"Tree Goats" by Angela Baldacci
Morocco | November 2016

Marrakesh is home to elaborate palaces, densely packed markets, ordained mosques, and abundant gardens. However, outside of the chaotic center I found a peculiar and humorous sight, apparently a traditional Moroccan phenomenon. Argan trees are a staple in Marrakesh and produce a fruit that apparently lures goats to their thorny and windy branches.

Curious New Friend

"Curious New Friend" by Delaney Higgins
South Africa | April 2016

Seconds after this picture was taken, this snappy (but adorable) African penguin almost successfully took a peck at my face. His home, Boulder’s Beach in Cape Town, is known for it’s warm waters and it’s colony of African penguins that attracts 60,000 visitors each year. Visitors can sunbathe and swim in the same waters and sands as the penguins that are very accustomed to human interaction. The penguins are listed as an endangered species due to pollution and habitat destruction.


Category: People and the Human Spirit

Caught In The Now

Category Winner

"Caught In The Now" by Emily Higgins
Indonesia | February 2016

Surrounded by so much history and awestruck by Candi Prambanan, an ancient Hindu temple, I found myself hypnotized by the woman on the stairs. Perched in the doorway, contrasting beautifully with the ashy grey of the large stone blocks and rainy skies, she stood there… holding what? A selfie stick.

Tashi Delek

"Tashi Delek" by Dana Scheffler
Bhutan | October 2016

On the 7 hour drive to the south eastern part of Bhutan the climate and ecosystem quickly began to transition along with the drastic drop in elevation, yet one aspect that never faltered was the kindness of the Bhutanese people. Throughout my time wandering around this lovely nation, the greatest lesson I took away was the sheer kindness that a human can have for a stranger. The Bhutanese taught me the power and influence each human can have on another whether it was someone lending me an umbrella in the middle of a typical monsoon rainstorm, or welcoming me into their house for tea despite our language barrier, or answering my endless questions about Buddhism with utter patience. Here, Jigme waved to us goodbye from the bars of his own home, while his mom sweetly repeated the words, “tashi delek” which loosely translates to “safe journey” both used in the sense of the present and your future life endeavors.

Vlottenburg Primary

"Vlottenburg Primary" by Kim MacPhail
  South Africa | April 2016

Four third graders of Vlottenburg Primary, a low-income school on the outskirts of Stellenbosch, show off their favorite poses under a rugby goal post on a rainy Monday afternoon in Vlottenburg, South Africa. With their smiles infectious and their energy unmatchable, the kids let loose by running around the field encompassed by barbed wire with the worries of the world out of mind.


Category: Society, Politics, Environment

The key to Peace

Category Winner

"The Key to Peace" by Corinne Harvey
Israel/Palestine | January 2017

This sculpture titled, “Key of Return,” stands at the entrance to the Aida refugee camp in Bethlehem, Palestine. It symbolizes the belief that one day the Palestinian people will be able to come back to their homes and the land that belongs to them. It was an incredible and eye-opening experience to see the struggles of these people first hand, to get a glimpse of what life is like for them and the oppression that they experience on a day to day basis, but also the hope that they continue to have. This picture sums that up for me.

Walking into the Midst of Living Memories

"Walking into the Midst of Living Memories" by Marie Maillet
Germany | April 2016

You survey the black steles bathed in sunlight. At your feet, you imagine that one could easily step up onto one and though they form an expanse in front of you, you think perhaps one could hop across this stone field. As you stride forward, you lose yourself allowing yourself to follow the perpendicular intersections but to not worry about lefts and rights; and you suddenly find that you are lost - perhaps not intellectually, but lost nonetheless.
The steles rise far above your head as the ground undulates. You continue. You are deep in the midst of the dark stone towers, but you walk on with a tight feeling taking over your chest.
And then, there is once again light in your world. And then, you emerge, more steles still in front of you and beside you, but you have emerged and can breathe in the space above the stele-tops. And there are trees. And there is life. There is life after the Holocaust; there is fear in forgetting.

Remembrance

"Remembrance" by Angela McParland
Japan | October 2016

The Genbaku Dome stands tall at the heart of a now bustling modern city as a reminder of where the atomic bomb “Little Boy” had been dropped on August 6, 1945, killing 70,000 people on impact and between another 20,000-96,000 people due to injury and radiation before the end of the year. On May 27, 2016, Barack Obama visited Hiroshima as the first US President to visit since the bombing. He made a speech, folded a paper crane in remembrance, and wrote, “We have known the agony of war. Let us now find the courage, together, to spread peace, and pursue a world without nuclear weapons.”

La Selva Urbana

"La Selva Urbana" by Jacob Sonberg
Panama | November 2016

Over the course of the last fifteen years, the rapid expansion of the ecotourism industry in Bocas del Toro has been nothing short of paradoxical. As tourists from around the globe flock to the region to appreciate Panama’s bounty of natural resources, it is the environment and residents of Bocas del Toro that must deal with the industry’s externalities. Far too often development projects aimed at accommodating this influx of tourists coupled with ineffective governance systems result in the destruction of the natural beauty that attracted people in the first place. It also marginalizes those Bocatorreños that do not have the means to relocate. This scene, captured in the low-income neighborhood of La Saigon, depicts the natural radiance that persists despite these circumstances, and—more importantly—the convergence of these socioeconomic and environmental externalities that have pervaded Bocas del Toro.


Category: The Essence of Study Abroad

Style First

Category Winner / The Barry Krikstone Best of Show Award

"Style First" by Dana Scheffler
  Bhutan| November 2016

This monastery was beautifully built into the side of a cliff and contains Guru Rinpoche’s left foot print and hand print from his time meditating. After spending 4 months learning the Buddhist culture and philosophy I began to notice the attraction towards certain sacred sights. The Shu Drak Monastery was the first moment I felt personally drawn into a state of peaceful mindfulness. I am unsure if it was my mindset that day or if it really had to do with the holiness of Guru Rinpoche’s presence. Once I awoke from my state of meditating, I crawled out of the cave and climbed over to the other side of the cliff to come across this man leaving a separate meditation hut. Despite our language barrier, he kindly approached me and pointed to my camera screen implying he wanted to see my photographs so far from that day. After scrolling through a few and giving me a thumbs up, he pointed at himself cueing me to take a portrait of him. Once I held the viewfinder up to my eye, he quickly hopped into this pose and gave me an award-winning smirk. When I showed him the image, he looked at me with a grin stretching from cheek to cheek and with his broken English he said, “I look fancy!”

Younger Brother

"Younger Brother" by Lesley Ann Neves
Tibet | July 2016

Typically, Tibetan children run away from photographers, shy of strangers’ intrigue and technology, and therefore, it is a rare moment indeed when a child in Tibet will allow themselves to be captured on film. Upon exiting a temple in Kangding, I discovered this boy sitting on the front steps diligently attending to his studies. Unlike the other monks who all turned their backs the moment a camera focused on them, this one stared calmly at me, as if I was the subject, not he. As I approached, his gaze stayed trained on me, taking in my make up covered face, my pink maxi dress, and my floral patterned purse with as much curiosity he expressed through reading his textbook. I quietly wondered about the dirt smudged on his face and shirt, and why he was permitted to study alone at such a young age. Eyes are typically described as the windows to the soul, but through this boy, I saw a reflection of myself mirrored in his still, trusting eyes. For transfixed in his stare, I saw we were not strangers, but two kindred spirits meeting for the first time in this lifetime and there was nothing to fear among one another.

A Moment Shared

"A Moment Shared" by Peter Caffrey
Mongolia | March 2016

Two Mongolian women in felt caps and Mongolian deels appreciating the view looking out over Erdenet, Mongolia. Right after this photo was taken they started talking in Mongolian to me. None of which I understood having only been in Mongolia for a few weeks. Eventually, through a lot of miming and awkward smiling, I realized they wanted me to take a photo of us together. I happily obliged and although we didn’t share a language I felt like we had shared a connection.

The Sun Rises with the Start of a New Beginning

"The Sun Rises with the Start of a New Beginning" by Micalea Leaska
  Tanzania | October 2016

This photo captures the essence of Tanzania because when someone thinks of Tanzania they immediately say safari, lions, elephants and so on. But what people don’t always realize is the beauty of the environment the safari is in. This photo was taken around 6:30 am after the sun had risen and these silent but giant creatures marched into the plains to reunite with the rest of their herd. In a way humans are similar to elephants, we have emotion, intelligence and are stronger together. When we unite we feel powerful and grow in size. Each day is a new beginning to make a difference in the world and move on from the past. These elephants do not have it easy, they walk miles for water and shade, but it is imprinted in their memory this way of life that cannot be broken. They are born to serve their herd and live as a family, as one whole. This is the beauty found throughout Tanzania, the people unite together with peace and open arms as one family. Children are taken care of by all, feed by those who have extra and given all they can provide. We are all one being who has a new beginning each day.


Category: Best Written Caption

Mindful Peace

Category Winner

"Mindful Peace" by Lesley Ann Neves
Tibet | July 2016

Most people climb a mountain to prove their physical endurance, but rarely nowadays do they climb a mountain to seek enlightenment. Breathless and soaked in sweat, I arrived at the monastery outside Bamei on top of a mountain hoping for a bottle of cold water and a comfy seat. Upon crossing the threshold into the Buddhist temple, I realized I did not go there, but rather I was brought there. Standing in the presence of twenty monks ranging from five to seventy five years old, their focus and dedication poured through their chants, washing my mind of earthly worries. I was allowed for the first time in my life to truly be without concern of what had been or what was to come, but to simply live in the precious present. The vibrant splendor contained within the temple’s walls echoed through my soul and gave to me a memory so raw and absolute that when the stresses and worries college transplants in our daily lives, I need only close my eyes to go back to the incense infused room where the monks chant in mindful peace.

Spirit in the Sky

"Spirit in the Sky" by Dana Scheffler
  Bhutan | September 2016

September 14, 2016 marks the day that one of the greatest souls left this earth. When the news had reached me on the other side of the world that I lost one of my dearest friends, Jerry, I became utterly lost and confused with a endless knot of emotions especially being so far away from my St. Mikes family. Knowing I had to do something to honor his spirit, I embarked on one of the most challenging hikes both physically and emotionally for me. Something about climbing to the highest peak in proximity (elevation: 13,580 ft) brought me some solitude. I climbed with the thought that the higher I got the closer I would get to him. After saying a few words and singing a few of his favorite songs (mainly Bright Eyes and Elliot Smith), I burned some incense and set up these prayer flags which were blessed the previous day by a local Tibetan Monk. Prayer flags are often set up in Buddhist tradition to honor those who have passed. The flags are inscribed with auspicious and sacred symbols and it is believed every time the wind blows the prayers and blessings become activated. The seven mala beads hanging from flags represent Jerry and his wonderful soul and spirit that is still within all of us today because even though he has left us physically he has by no means left us emotionally. His flags now face the north western peaks of the Himalayas along with the tallest unclimbed peak in the world, Gangkhar Puensum. Love you Jer and hope you enjoy the view you deserve from up there.

Dancing Through the Pain

"Dancing Through the Pain" by Lindsey Rogers
Argentina | November 2016

During my time in Argentina, I learned about the country’s history of political turmoil and injustice. One of the most jarring events I learned about is called the “Disappeared,” in which 10,000 individuals were taken from their homes by government officials, tortured, and killed. This photo represents the light, hope, and positivity that emanates from the city of Buenos Aires. Despite its tumultuous political history and in the midst of widespread protest and activism, people still indulge in dulce de leche, experience a rich nightlife, and go tango dancing. These tango dancers embody this resilient spirit as they walk down a sunny cobble-stoned street in Buenos Aires, enjoying the little things in life.

Conservation Area

"Conservation Area" by Jacob Sonberg
Panama

For many developing countries, it is difficult to balance the tradeoffs between expanding productivity and pursuing environmental sustainability. This scene, less than one kilometer from the Tropical Island Biodiversity Studies Center, portrays the discontinuity in environmental legislation and economic development in Bocas del Toro, Panama. A strong grasp of the Spanish language is not required to understand the redundancy of this “conservation area” which has been penetrated by a stormwater pipe that directs untreated runoff from one of the most heavily traveled roads on Isla Colón. As villas continue to spring up and roads crisscross the lowland rainforest in Bocas del Toro, it is vital for Panamanian officials to mitigate the negative effects of these developments and become advocates for the archipelago’s unique ecosystems.

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