Graduate Education Courses

Please find required Master's and Licensure courses in the five concentration tabs on our Master's in Education page.  If you have any questions, please contact the academic advisor listed. The syllabi will be posted on Canvas, our learning management system.

Accepted students in their first semester, and students not in our program, must submit a paper registration form. Course confirmations come from the Registrar's Office. Accepted students in their 2nd semester can register online through KnightVision.  

   

Education Course Offerings

This is a tentative schedule for planning purposes. Fall and spring courses are offered from 5pm -7:30pm, with a few exceptions beginning 30 minutes earlier or later. Click here to access the Graduate Course catalog for course descriptions. 

Last updated July 31, 2018


CODE COURSE TITLE CR SUMMER FALL SPRING
GED 508 Current Topics in Special Education

3

X



GED 509 Integrative Curriculum

3


W


GED 510 Becoming A Literacy Leader: Tools & Strategies for Success

3

X

GED 511 Fundamentals of Curriculum

3


TH

W

GED 516

Educational Foundations: Understanding the Past and Creating the Future

3


M

TH 

GED 517 Teaching Nonfiction in the Elementary Grades  3

T in odd years
GED 520 Child and Adolescent Development 3

X



GED 521 NEW! Early Childhood Education: Foundations  3

 

T
GED 522

 Teaching Literacy in the Pre-K-6 Classroom

   T  
GED 524 NEW! Early Childhood Education: Methods and Practice 3      day tbd
GED 526 Special Topics 3

X

X

X

GED 528 Pre-K-6 Curriculum, Assessment and Management 4

W

GED 529 Personalized Learning  X   

 TH

GED 530 Literacy in Middle and Secondary Schools 3
TH

 

GED 534 Literacy Assessment, Instruction, and Intervention in Reading 3

M

GED 535 Children's Literature: Author and Illustrator Study 3

X



GED 544 Mindfulness Education: Cultivating Caring, Attention, Awareness and Self-Regulation     

contact GED office

GED 547 Middle and Secondary Curriculum and Assessment 4

TH

GED 550 Student Teaching Internship
6    X

       X         

GED 555
Student Teaching Seminar
3   T
 T
GED 558 Educator as Researcher
3

X

T

 
GED 562 Thesis Research 3

X

X

X

GED 565 Computer-Assisted Language Learning (Cross listed with GSL 520) 3
Online
GED 567 Legal and Financial Management of Schools 4

 

T
GED 572 School Leadership 3

 T 


GED 580 Approaches to Teaching 
3

 

M
GED 581 Social/Emotional Development and Individual Differences  3 TH
 
GED 595 Launching and Developing the Writing Workshop in the Elementary Grades 3

 


W
GED 596 Digital Media 3

T

GED 606 Literacy Development and Instruction in the Elementary Grades 3


  


GED 607 Literacy Instruction for Struggling Adolescent Readers: Intervention and Instruction 3

X



GED 612 Math and Diversity 3

M


GED 613 Mathematics in the Pre-K-6 Classroom 3

T

GED 618 From Assessment to Action: Using Data to Improve Schools 3

X



GED 621 Supervision, Evaluation & Teacher Development 3

TH

GED 623 Ceramics for Educators 3

M

GED 624 The Art of the Book  X    
GED 631 Development, Learning, and Individual Differences  3

X



GED 632 Assessment of Students within General and Special Education 3

 

T
GED 633 Legal and Professional Issues in Special Education 3 X

 

GED 635A Middle Grades: Organizational Strand 3 X

W

GED 635A Middle Grades Summer Institute 3

X



GED 639 Special Education Placement for GED 640    TH  
GED 640 Language and Learning 3

TH


GED 641 Teaching in an Inclusive Classroom Pre-K-12 3

X

T


GED 643 Multisensory Language-Based Literacy Instruction for Students with Disabilities, Pre-K-6 3

X



GED 649 Arts:The Creative Process 3

W
odd
years

GED 651 Hand On! Learning in and through the Arts 3

T
odd years


GED 661 Special Education Practicum  3

 

N/A
GED
662
Special Education Seminar   3      W
GED 668  Administration & Interpretation of Woodcock-Johnson IV  3 X    
GED 669 Oral Traditions & Literacy: Readers' Theater, Poetry Slams and Storytelling 3  

TH

 
GED 673 Special Topics in Art Education 1-3

X

X

X

GED 674 Multicultural Arts 3

 

T
 even years 

GED 675   Educator as Artist: Personalized Learning, Teaching,and Engaging in the Artistic Process   X  
GED 678 Heroes, Art & Social Justice: Aesthetic Perspectives 3

  X
in odd years

 
GED 684 School and Community 3

X



GED 686 Independent Research 1-6

X

X

X

GED 687 Directed Readings 1-6

X

X

X

GED 688A School Leadership Practicum, Part 1 (summer), Part II (fall), Part III (spring)
(2 cr/semester) Year-long Practicum
6 X

M

M

GED 688D
Reading Specialist Practicum
 3    X  X
GED 693 Integrating Art, Social Studies & Language Arts: Pre-K-6  3 X
in even years
 

 

GED 695 Teaching Pre-K-6 Science and Engineering 3 X

GED 699 Capstone Seminar 3

X


TH

Summer 2018 Graduate Education Courses

Summer 2018 tuition incentive is 25% off the per credit price.  All GED courses are $440 per credit!

Please note: the summer incentive does not apply to Independent Studies, Contract Courses GED 527, GED 635, or courses taken for audit.

Registration is now open for all students. Course offerings, dates and times are subject to change.


Graduate Education Course Schedule
Summer 2018 (May 21 – August 10)

No Classes Held Memorial Day and July 4th – campus is closed

# Course Title Instructor Credits Course Date
GED 508 Current Topics in Special Education: Supporting All Students Andrea Griffin 3cr. M-Th, 7/9-7/12, 7/16-7/19 @ 8-12:45pm
GED 510 Becoming a Literacy Leader: Tools and Strategies for Success Gayle Moskowitz 3cr. Wed. 5/23, 5/30 @ 5-8pm, T-Th 7/17-7/19 @ 8-12:30pm, T-F 7/24-7/27 @ 8-12:30pm
GED 520 Child and Adolescent Development Jenny Stearns 3cr. Wed. 6/27, 7/18, 7/25, 8/1 @ 1-4:30pm, M-Th 8/6-8/9 @ 9-4pm
GED 526A Mindful Awareness and Sustainable Well-Being: Resilience for Educators and the Earth Sam Crowell 3cr. M-F 7/30-8/3, 8/6-8/10 @ 8:30am-12:30pm
GED 526B Diversity Equity Literacy: Addressing Bias in the Classroom Rebecca Haslam 3cr. this course is cancelled due to low enrollment
GED 526C School Technology Leadership and Innovation, Course #2 in EILT series Ellen Thompson 3cr. This is an online course, 7/6-8/10, self-paced with students actively using online tools during the course dates.
GED 527A A Costa Rican Experience for Educators: Integrating Sustainability Values into the Classroom Sam Crowell - M-F 7/2-7/6 @ 9am-5pm (including 7/4)
GED 535 Children’s Literature: Author and Illustrator Study Anita Silvey 3cr. M-Th 7/9-7/12 @ 8:30-12:30pm, F 8/10 @ 8:30-12:30pm
GED 558 Educator as Researcher Claudine Bedell 3cr. Tues. 5/22, 5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/19 @ 4:30-8:30pm, Tues. 6/26, 7/10, 7/17, 7/24 @ 1-5pm
GED 607 Literacy Instruction for Struggling Adolescent Readers David Mendenhall 3cr. M-F 6/25-6/29, 7/2-7/6 @ 8am-12:15pm
GED 618 From Assessment to Action: Using Data to Improve Schools Dan French 3cr. M-F 7/16-7/20, 7/23-7/27 @ 8am-12:15pm
GED 624 The Art of the Book Ann Joppe-Mercure 3cr. M-F 7/9-7/13, 7/16-7/20 @ 8:30am-12:15pm
GED 631 Learning, Development and Individual Differences Dylan McNamara 3cr. Tues. 5/22 @ 5-8pm, Mon. 6/11, 6/25, 7/16, 7/30, 8/6 @ 5-8pm, Wed. 8/8 @ 5-8pm, and online Mon. 6/4, 6/18, 7/9 and Tues. 7/23
GED 633 Legal and Professional Issues in Special Education Tania Hayes 3cr. Mon. 5/21 @ 4:30-7:30pm, 6/4 @ 5-7:30pm, M 6/18 @4-8pm, T-F 6/19-6/22 @ noon-4pm, and 3 hrs online weeks 5/21, 5/28, 6/4, 6/11
GED 635 Middle Grades Summer Institute - 3cr. M-F 6/25-6/29 @ 8am-5pm, with a follow-up conference in January 2019
GED 641 Teaching in an Inclusive Classroom Pre-K-12 Cathy Quinn 3cr. Tues. 6/5, 6/12, 6/19, 6/26, 7/10, 7/17, 7/24, 7/31 @ 4-8:30pm
GED 643 Multisensory Language-Based Literacy Instructions for Students with Disabilities PreK-6 Amy Knight 3cr. M-F 7/9-7/13, 7/16-7/20, 7/23-7/27 @ 8:30-11:30am
GED 668 Administration and Interpretation of the Woodcock-Johnson IV Rich Reid 3cr. M-F 6/25-6/29 @ 8:30-3:30pm, and follow-up one Saturday half-day in Fall 2018
GED 684 School and Community Valerie Gardner 3cr. W-F 6/20-6/22 @ 8am-12:15pm, M-F 6/25-6/29 @ 8am-12:15pm, M-T 7/2-7/3 @ 8am-12:15pm
GED 688 School Leadership Practicum – Part I Valerie Gardner 2cr. W 5/23 @ 5-7:30pm, Th 5/31 @ 5-7:30pm, August meeting TBD
GED 695 Teaching Pre-K-6 Science and Engineering Elizabeth Mirra 3cr. M-F 6/25-6/29, 7/2-7/6 @ 8:30-12:30pm
GED 699A Capstone Seminar James Nagle 3cr. T 5/1, 5/15 @ 4-7pm, T 5/22, 5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/19, 6/26 @ 4-8pm, M-T 7/2-7/3 @ 1-5pm

This course is designed for general educators, special educators, social workers, paraprofessionals, or any adults supporting students who struggle in school. Participants will design strategic plans, lessons, and learning opportunities for individual students in regular education settings.  The course will focus on: effective strategies for keeping struggling students engaged in learning, the profound way trauma impacts student learning, how to collaboratively problem solve with students, systems to keep students in classrooms including safety and transition plans, and ways to involve parents and families in the learning process.  Together we will explore the best approaches for working with students who have a variety of needs including students with ADHD, ASD, emotional disturbance, who display oppositional behaviors, and students who have experienced trauma.

This interactive and student-centered course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to lead improvements in literacy instruction and student achievement in their schools or districts. Various models of literacy leadership, professional development, literacy instruction and literacy intervention will be examined. This course is highly recommended for students in the M.Ed. and C.A.G.S. Reading Concentrations.  It is open to all graduate education students interested in leading improvements in literacy instruction and intervention.

This course provides an interdisciplinary analysis of child and adolescent development through an exploration of varied theories, including contemporary cultural influences.  It examines physical, cognitive, emotional, social, moral, and spiritual dimensions and stages of development, along with implications for learning.

This course will address how stress impacts overall teacher performance and will provide opportunities to learn and experience regenerative practices that are so necessary for resilience and well-being. It will include Earth-based concepts that realign us with nature, with natural learning, and with those essential qualities that sustain us.

In our increasingly diverse schools, it is essential to create culturally inclusive and equity literate school environments in order for all students to feel welcome and affirmed, and for instructional practices to lead to equitable opportunities for success. In this course, teachers, counselors, special educators, specialists, and administrators will develop the skills to recognize incidents of bias when they occur, respond in the moment, redress and repair harm, and better understand the impacts of bias on student achievement and well-being.  Students will develop their own “equity lens” through which to analyze curricula, language, pedagogy, and instructional decision making. This course will examine historical and current contexts of educational inequities including successful and ineffective interventions aimed at addressing racism and other forms of oppression. Throughout the course, students will engage in the reflexive practice of investigating the ways in which their own identity markers, levels of privilege, and implicit biases inform their practice as educators.

This course will enable participants to explore the role school communities and school/district leadership play as our instructional landscape scales up to create personalized, learner-centered environments that respond to each student’s needs and interests. High-quality instruction, paired with the appropriate technological tools used to build the connections for all students between the person and the content is the key. Leadership principles will be examined to better understand the intricacies of how to effect change within a school culture to support and enact this personalization for all students.

Registration requires approval by Director Dan French, students must register using paper registration form.

This is a contract Course held at the Earth Charter Center in Costa Rica
This course offers an opportunity to deepen one's understanding of sustainable development and its implications for education, learning and change. Located on the beautiful campus of the United Nations' University for Peace in Costa Rica, the one-week course will explore practical methods for introducing sustainability into educational settings using the Earth Charter and Sustainable Development Goals. Appropriate for all educators and grade levels. Topics include values-based learning, transformative education, systems thinking, and Earth Charter resources.

Students will find course information here.

This contract course requires joint registration between Saint Michael's College and The Earth Charter Center for Education for Sustainable Development. The Earth Charter registration is done online here. The Saint Michael's College registration is done using the contract course paper registration form here. Please return form to Paula Henry in the Education office.

Tuition for all students is $800. Students are responsible for their own flight and accommodations. Gloriana Lara can assist with housing information and other particulars.

After the instructor presents the components of a successful picture book, seven author-illustrators will be traced from their first book to their final work -- Virginia Lee Burton, James Marshall, Ezra Jack Keats, Lois Ehlert, Eric Carle, David Wiesner, and Laura Vacarro Seeger. Class members will read and evaluate the works of these creators and in the final class present an author study. Drawing on forty years of experience in publishing and reviewing books, Anita Silvey will model different approaches to author units and help each student execute a final project that can be used in the classroom or library.

This course introduces students to the world of educational research so that they will be able to read qualitative and quantitative studies intelligently, and learn to design and conduct qualitatively oriented studies themselves. Beginning with an overview of the epistemological assumptions behind different kinds of research, the course will explore various types of research approaches and the kinds of topics and queries they support. Students will read and critique examples of published research of various kinds, chosen for the interests of course participants. Next, students will investigate topic development and various methods of collecting and analyzing qualitative data. Finally, students will develop a research proposal for their own research project. This course also assesses students’ writing proficiency which must be demonstrated before acceptance to candidacy.

Prerequisites: This course should be taken at the end of the Master’s program and two semesters prior to Capstone to allow students with at least one semester to collect data for the Capstone project.

Registration requires approval by instructor, students must register using paper registration form.

The What Works Clearinghouse, the International Reading Association, and the National Council of Teachers of English have all examined research on effective classroom and intervention practices for struggling adolescents. This course is designed to build on this knowledge base as we explore ways to assess and adjust literacy instruction to the strengths and needs of adolescent students.

This course will provide students with an understanding of the cultural shifts inherent in schools evolving from NCLB legislation and the increased focus on monitoring student learning.  Students will develop the necessary understandings and tools to make connections between Vermont’s grade expectations, the Common Core, local curriculum and formative and summative assessment of student learning.  Students will explore ways to use state and local student assessment data to make decisions about instruction, professional development and school/supervisory union based action planning.  Students will develop an understanding of curriculum in the context of standards, assessment, instruction and student learning.  Students will need access to school assessment data that will be used throughout the course. Students without a teacher license require instructor approval.  The course syllabus and reading material will be sent to participants prior to the beginning of the course. Access to some element of student performance data (class, grade, school-wide) required or otherwise arranged with instructor prior to initial class).

Educators and students are invited to explore and create in this studio course addressing the art of the book. Participants will experiment with forms, structures, materials, and concepts as we investigate the limitless possibilities of the Book.  By surveying the historical need to record and contain knowledge and by examining the work of contemporary book artist students will gain a foundation for their own creative expression of ideas and meaning.  Students will make a working portfolio of paper treatments, book models and altered structures then create their own individual art books.

The class will be a working model of a 21st century collaborative community supporting the creative process through practice, constructive criticism, reflecting, and refining technique.  The Common Core anchor standards of Craft and Structure and Integration of Knowledge and Ideas will be addressed. No previous bookmaking or art experience required. Students who have previously taken GED 671 The Art of Bookmaking and/or GED 673 Science, Art and Bookmaking: Making Connections, are welcome in this class.

A $50.00 materials fee is required and due at registration.

This course will engage students in examining learning theories from birth through early adulthood. Students will examine how language, culture, and family background influence learning.  Students will consider how development impacts learning at all stages and implications for effective instruction for children with exceptionalities. Students will participate by attending class and engaging in learning activities online.  Activities will include opportunities designing lessons, rubrics, concept maps, and strategy logs related to course content.  Students will also engage in self-directed learning by selecting a relevant topic to explore and present, to further engage and expand their learning and that of their classmates.  All activities throughout the course are designed to provide students with an opportunity to apply course content to current or prospective practice.  Students will also be required to write up a reflection and synthesis of their learning throughout the course.

In this course students will focus on the legal and ethical issues involved in developing, implementing and overseeing educational programming for students with disabilities.  The course is organized around critical elements of special education and disability law, and aims to develop an understanding not only of the legal implications of such laws but also how those laws impact the delivery of high quality, effective educational programming for all students.

Please pick one pathway (first 4 are for middle level endorsement):
GED 635A:  Middle Grades Organization
GED 635B:  Middle Grades Curriculum
GED 635C:  Embedded Literacy in Middle Grades
GED 635D:  Brain Based Education for Young Adolescents
GED 635M: Middle School Is Not a Building

Participants select one of the above pathways. The first four can be credited toward a middle level endorsement. Individuals and teams of teachers seeking further professional development in middle grades philosophy and practice are encouraged to enroll in GED 635M: Middle School Is Not a Building.

For registration and information please contact James Nagle at Saint Michael's College or visit middlegradescollaborative.org.

Costs for the Institute are: $1,500 for non-credit; and $1,950 for credit. Tuition includes room and board, but residency is not required. Checks and money orders are payable to the Middle Grades Collaborative, 227 Leap Frog Hollow, Montpelier, VT 05602.

In this course participants will learn how to teach and accommodate students with disabilities in any regular classroom. Basic special education history and laws will be examined. Participants will explore the complex nature of serving students with special needs and discover specific strategies for making inclusion work. Participants will be responsible for finding a student to tutor for 2 hours per week to complete a case study as part of the course requirements. Please have a tutoring opportunity in mind when registering.

Held on-campus week 1, then at JJ Flynn Elementary School, 1645 North Avenue, Burlington for weeks 2 & 3.

This course provides an in-depth study of sound instructional practices and materials to use with struggling learners based on an analysis of the learner’s strengths and challenges in the area of reading and written language. Methods used to teach reading, spelling, study, and writing skills are covered. The emphasis is on working with students in elementary schools. Course times include practicum experience.

Prerequisite: GED 522 Teaching Literacy in the Elementary Classroom

The Woodcock-Johnson Psycho-Educational Battery - Fourth Edition (WJ-IV) is a wide-range, comprehensive set of individually administered tests for measuring cognitive abilities, academic achievement, and oral language development.  The WJ-IV has been updated to reflect the contemporary research on cognitive abilities, to increase utility relative to determining special education eligibility, to provide greater diagnostic capabilities to inform instruction, and to reflect the research regarding language development and overall academic achievement.  Through participation in this course, participants will learn about the tests, factors, and scoring options that result from the administration of this test battery.  Students will also learn to administer, score, and interpret the WJ-IV.  Classroom discussions, demonstrations, and activities will be supplemented by three complete administrations of the battery.  Students who successfully complete this course will have met the training criteria recommended by the authors and publisher of the WJ-IV.  The course will also include a discussion of a variety of essential related topics such as Vermont's special education eligibility criteria as they relate to tests and scoring options.  The WJ-IV will also be thoroughly examined in regard to its use within Responsiveness to Intervention (RtI) model of student support.

This course introduces current and prospective educators and administrators to the ever changing, but closely coupled, relationship between school and community. Emphasis will be placed on how the community informs what happens in schools, and how the schools, in turn, influence the community. The course will also look closely at the role played by economic, political and social forces.

This course is designed for students in School Leadership (Principal, Director of Special Education, and Director of Curriculum) who are seeking endorsements from the Agency of Education. The course includes a 300-hour internship, completion of a professional portfolio, and additional study in the areas of leadership. The course is broken into 3 parts and requires a Full Year commitment. Students will be expected to complete a portion of their internship hours during the summer. Students will enroll in each part when the semester registration opens.  They must be taken in sequence during one academic year.

Registration requires approval by instructor, students must register using paper registration form.

There are three parts to this Internship; Part I summer, Part II fall, Part III spring.  Students will receive grades of Pass/Fail for Part I and Part II.  A final grade will be given for Part III.  Each part is 2 credits. The class meets monthly for Part II and Part III. The dates for Part II and Part III will be given at the June meeting.

This course is designed to explore the many facets of teaching science and engineering at the K-8 levels. Course participants will explore Inquiry-Centered Science and Engineering concepts and skills through a variety of hands-on, minds-on activities. Course topics will include an exploration of the New Generation Science Standards as well as State and local science and engineering standards, instructional resource materials, selected science and engineering programs, the application of technology in science and engineering education as well as ways students construct a meaningful understanding of science and engineering concepts.

A $25 materials fee is required and due at registration.

This course supports students as they complete the M.Ed. program. Students research a topic in their field of interest in GED 558, complete data analysis in GED 699, and then both a paper and a presentation demonstrating their in-depth understanding of this topic. Research skills, critique and reflection, and expressive presentations are included.

Note: GED 558 and GED 699 are required for the Master’s in Education. Students develop a research proposal in GED 558, collect the data the following semester, then write and present findings in GED 699. It is necessary to leave at least one semester between GED 558 and GED 699 for the following reasons: (1) if taken back to back, GED 558 may not have ended before GED 699 begins, resulting in the research proposal not being ready for the first Capstone class, and (2) it allows more time for data collection.

The Educator as Researcher instructor approves the research proposal (Introduction, Literature Review and Methodology) if the proposal is ready. In addition, students must submit the online Institutional Review Board (IRB) application to the IRB coordinator during GED 558 and be accepted before collecting data and enrolling in GED 699.

Prerequisites: GED 558 Educator as Researcher, an accepted research proposal, and approved IRB application.

Registration requires approval by instructor, students must register using paper registration form.

Fall 2018 Graduate Education course registration is now open for all students - Classes start week of 8/27/18.

Course # Course Name & Credits Instructor Times
Monday      
GED 516 Educational Foundations: Understanding the Past and Creating the Future (3 cr.) Allegra Miller 5:00-7:30pm
GED 612 Math and Diversity (3 cr.) John Tapper 5:00-7:30pm
GED 688 School Leadership Practicum for: Principal, Director of Special Education or Director of Curriculum – Part II (2 cr.) First class in September to be determined at final summer class meeting. (Part III is in SP19 for 2 cr.) Val Gardner 5:00-7:30pm
Tuesday      
GED 550 Student Teaching Internship (6 cr.)
Students register with GED 555
Amy Saks Pavese N/A
GED 555 Student Teaching Seminar (3 cr.)
Students register with GED 550
Jenny Stearns 3:45-6:15pm
GED 558 Educator as Researcher (3 cr.)
Instructor approval needed, paper registration only.
James Nagle 5:00-7:30pm
GED 572 School Leadership (3 cr.) Laurie Singer 5:00-7:30pm
GED 606 Literacy Development and Instruction in the Elementary Grades (3 cr.) Ellen Thompson 5:00-7:30pm
GED 641 Teaching in an Inclusive Classroom Pre-K-12 (3 cr.)
Prerequisite: must have taken GED 516 Educational Foundations.
Cathy Quinn 5:00-7:30pm
GED 674 Multicultural Arts (3 cr.)
A $50 materials fee is required and due at registration.
Ann Joppe-Mercure 5:00-7:30pm
Wednesday      
GED 509 Integrative Curriculum (3 cr.) Rebecca Haslam 5:00-7:30pm
Thursday      
GED 511 Fundamentals of Curriculum (3 cr.) John Barone 5:00-7:30pm
GED 522 Teaching Literacy in the Pre-K-6 classroom (3 cr.) Gayle Moskowitz 5:00-7:30pm
GED 530 Literacy in Middle and Secondary Schools (3 cr.) Becky Wigglesworth 5:00-7:30pm
GED 581 Social/Emotional Development and Individual Differences (3 cr.) Richard Reid 4:30-6:30pm
GED 639 Special Education Placement (1 cr.)
Prerequisite: GED 522 (Students also register for GED 640)
Amy Knight n/a
GED 640 Language and Learning (3 cr.)
Prerequisite GED 522 or GED 606
Amy Knight 6:45-8:45pm
Online  (there are no Graduate Education courses on Friday)    
GED 565 Computer-Assisted Language Learning (3 cr.)
Cross listed with GSL 520
NOTE: Registration must be completed by August 13, 2018
Christine Bauer-Ramazani Online

This course is designed as an introductory course for people considering careers as teachers. The course begins by exploring schools and schooling in the United States, including an examination of motives for teaching, the functions and purposes of schools, and what life is like in schools today. We will then look at the diversity of students who populate our schools, and how various societal factors affect schools. Next, the course focuses on teachers, including what constitutes effective teaching, what teachers should know about teaching with technology, and what subjects are taught as part of a school’s curriculum. We will then examine the foundations of education (philosophy, history, legal and ethical considerations, and governance and finance issues) that provide the intellectual underpinnings of educational practice. We will also examine current reform efforts in education. We will finish the course by looking at career issues, including the job options in education, salary expectations, and what it means to be a professional teacher.

This course will explore theories, ideas and practices for guiding learning in math for students with diverse characteristics at the PK – 8 levels. Students will investigate current literature on cultural, pedagogical and developmental issues related to how children learn mathematics in the four selected areas of diversity; math and students who are speakers of other languages (ELL), math and students with special needs, math and students with math disabilities, and math and students in poverty. Course content will include  the math pedagogical content knowledge associated with numeracy, operations and problem solving,  the SIOP model of instruction, the WIDA standards, strategies for differentiating instruction and assessing diverse learner characteristics as well as issues associated with developmentally appropriate practice.

This course is designed for students in School Leadership (Principal, Director of Special Education, and Director of Curriculum) who are seeking endorsements from the Agency of Education. The course includes a 300-hour internship, completion of a professional portfolio, and additional study in the areas of leadership. The course is broken into 3 parts and requires a full year commitment. Student will be expected to complete internship hours during the summer. Students will enroll in each part when the semester registration opens. They must be taken in sequence during one academic year. Students will receive grades of Pass/Fail for Part I and Part II. A final grade will be given for Part III, spring semester.

Includes: Art, Elementary Education, English Language Learners, Middle and Secondary Licensure Programs.
Students register for this and GED 555 at the same time. Enrollment by special arrangement only.

Taken concurrently with the student teaching internship (GED 550), this course focuses on standards, teaching strategies, classroom culture, management techniques, collaboration, problem solving, philosophical questions, assessment, and communication skills.  Students complete their required portfolio for licensure during this course. The seminar is designed to provide support for student teachers in the field.  Enrollment by special arrangement only.

This course introduces students to the world of educational research so that they are able to intelligently read qualitative and quantitative studies, and learn to design and conduct qualitatively oriented research projects. Beginning with an overview of the different types of research, the course explores various research approaches, methods, and analyses. Students read and critique educational research articles in their chosen field. Finally, students design a research proposal to be implemented over a semester. Prerequisites: This course should be taken at the end of the M.Ed. program and two semesters prior to GED 699 - Capstone Seminar so that students have at least one semester to collect data.

This course will examine the complexities of modern school leadership from theoretical, practical, and ethical perspectives with a focus on what is meant to be a good school leader. Emphasis in the course is    on the practice of school leadership. The course will examine topics such as: the nature of leadership, recognizing leadership traits, developing leadership skills, creating a vision, setting the tone, listening to out-group members, handling conflict, overcoming obstacles, and examining the ethical foundations of school leadership.

This course is designed for licensed teachers and will focus on literacy development and instruction in grades PK-8.  We will explore the research and “best practices” in literacy instruction with a particular emphasis on differentiated instruction within the context of the new Common Core Standards.

In this course participants will learn how to teach and accommodate students with disabilities in any regular classroom. Basic special education history and laws will be examined. Participants will explore the complex nature of serving students with special needs and discover specific strategies for making inclusion work. Participants will be responsible for finding a student to tutor for 2 hours per week to complete a case study as a part of the course requirements.
Prerequisite: Must have taken GED 516 Educational Foundations.

This course will combine the discipline of visual arts with the concept of multicultural studies. By engaging in hands-on projects, using artifacts, going on field trips, and discussing professional readings, participants will learn to integrate multicultural studies into their curriculum. The major themes of the course come from world cultures and folk art. This course fulfills the integrated arts requirement in the Arts in Education concentration. A $50.00 materials fee is due upon registration.

Integrative Curriculum: This course offers a theoretical overview of varied approaches to integrative curriculum, as well as practical applications. Based in a holistic developmental perspective, it considers intellectual, emotional, social, ethical and spiritual dimensions of curriculum and contrasts developmentally appropriate disciplinary and interdisciplinary methods of curriculum development, instruction and assessment. Participants also examine the relationship between personalized learning, differentiated instruction, individualized education and student directed learning, and they consider contemplative, ecological, multi-cultural, and technology based approaches to curriculum development and instruction.

This course focuses on definitions and diverse perspectives on curriculum for curriculum leaders. Participants examine major theoretical frameworks of curriculum; become familiar with varying approaches to curriculum planning, development, design, implementation, and evaluation; articulate their own perspectives on curriculum; examine the link between curriculum, instruction, and assessment, as well as the connection of these to budgeting and finance; and learn to critique curriculum from a variety of different perspectives, including how schools should examine and critique their own curricula.

This course is designed to provide pre-licensure students, novice teachers, and those returning to the field with an overview of literacy development and instruction.  The components of a balanced literacy curriculum will be introduced, including: shared reading, read aloud, word study and the reading and writing workshop. The framework of the workshop will be discussed in depth, including: mini lessons, small group instruction (guided reading, strategy groups and discussion groups), conferring, partnerships and writing about reading. Class sessions will combine whole group and small group instruction, book discussions, video snippets and an offsite classroom visit. This course is practical in nature and will build an understanding of how to use a variety of assessment to drive effective instruction for all students.  It is a requirement in the Elementary Education Licensure Program. (Practicing teachers are encouraged to take GED 606- Literacy Development and Instruction PK-8

This course examines the relationship between language, literacy skills, and learning in the content area. We will focus on how explicit literacy instruction promotes better content learning and provides all students with tools they need to participate in our global community. We will consider theories about and evolving definitions of literacy, the process of reading and writing, the relationship between technology and literacy, specific disciplinary approaches to literacy, diverse literacy needs and corresponding pedagogical strategies, and techniques for evaluating content area resources.  We will also examine state and national standards and proficiencies to enrich our understanding of student needs and curriculum design.

This course examines commonly occurring emotional and behavioral disorders of childhood and how they influence student learning. Participants will develop an understanding of specific disorders that can serve to inform appropriate instructional strategies and interventions. Empirically derived and research supported interventions and strategies to support these students will be explored An emphasis will be placed on structuring general education learning environments to accommodate the needs of a diverse range of students, as well as the identification of specific programs and strategies to support children with various disabilities. General educators will gain skills and knowledge to incorporate into their classrooms while special educators will expand their base of knowledge to support their consultation to general education personnel.

This course is a one-credit companion course to GED 640: Language and Learning.  The purpose of this field-based course is to provide participants with an opportunity to apply their newly acquired knowledge and strategies to authentic language work with a school-aged student.  Participants will design and implement language-based literacy practices with their student over the course of ten weeks and reflect upon their practice and the student’s language progress. Participants are required to complete 30 hours of work with a student.  This is a required course for graduate students working toward licensure in Special Education.

The teaching of language is vast and often feels amorphous.  Language transcends every area of culture and our experiences.  In this course, students will fine-tune their lens on language development (from birth to adulthood) and its impact on learning.   Rather than teaching language using isolated, disjointed methods, participants will learn to weave language instruction seamlessly into their current curricPula.  Early identification of weaknesses and well as strategies to determine the area of language that is challenging for the student will be studied. Participants will reflect on the massive implications of language weakness on a student’s overall academic experience.  Areas of language disorder, the assessment process and tools, and the criteria for a language impairment will be reviewed. Strategies for providing support, accommodation, and modification within the general and special education setting will be illuminated. Participants will employ the creative process of designing language-rich curricula that utilizes the accommodations and modifications necessary for students with language deficits to enrich the content for all learners.  This exploration will include the use of assistive technology. If you are a graduate student working toward your license in Special Education, you are required to enroll in GED 639, a one-credit companion course to GED 640. Prerequisite is GED 522 or GED 606, or permission from the advisor.

Participants learn how to incorporate computer and mobile technology into flipped classroom lessons that enhance the skills of English language learners (K-12, adult) through project-based activities, including newsletters, animated slide shows, and free Web-based multimedia and assessment tools. Participants construct an interactive/collaborative portfolio Web space (Wiki) for teaching and learning, review current research and follow the professional dialogue about technology in the classroom. They discuss the effectiveness of technological media through peer reviews and critical evaluation of Web sites and/or courseware. Course meets requirements for ESL licensure. Cross-listed with GSL 520. NOTE: For this course registration must be completed by August 13, 2018.

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