Maj
Min

Economics

About

As an economics major at Saint Michael’s you will explore the trends that are transforming our economy and changing the world we live in. Your classes will examine topics such as income inequality, immigration, international economic development, discrimination, globalization, health care reform, trade deficits, the U.S. debt, and more. In all your courses, you will learn a new set of analytical techniques, and critical thinking and communication skills that are in demand throughout the economy.

At Saint Michael’s you’ll find small, personalized, challenging economics classes taught by a group of dedicated faculty who bring diverse philosophical perspectives to the classroom, who care deeply about student learning, and who try to make economics relevant and fun.

Sample 4-Year Plan

Fall

EC 101 Principles of Macroeconomics
First Year Seminar
Liberal Studies courses

Spring

EC 103 Principles of Microeconomics
MA 130 or 150 Calculus
Liberal Studies Courses

Fall

EC 205 Statistics for Economics
EC 311 Macroeconomic Theory
Liberal Studies courses

Spring

EC 312 Microeconomic Theory
Economics elective
Liberal Studies courses

Fall

Economics elective
Junior Seminar
Electives

Spring

Economics elective
Electives

Fall

EC 410 A Senior Seminar in Economics I
Economics elective
Electives

Spring

EC 410 B Senior Seminar in Economics II
Economics elective
Electives

In Depth

Your first courses will teach you about key economic concepts and the role of markets, along with how to measure and interpret Gross Domestic Product (GDP), unemployment and price levels. You’ll examine economic instability through a study of causes and policy prescriptions from two major opposing schools of thought: Classical and Keynesian. You’ll learn about interest rates and the Federal Reserve and consider current policy debates on international trade, monetary and fiscal policy, the deficit, economic growth and productivity. You’ll also have an introduction to how economists interpret the everyday decisions of consumers, businesses and workers and apply economic analysis to real-world questions like minimum wage, business profits, taxes, outsourcing and environmental policies.

Later courses cover statistical thinking as applied to such topics as probability distributions, regressions, correlation, analysis of variance and so on. Advanced macro- and micro-economics classes in our department delve deeper into theories and policies surrounding income and price level, interest rates and monetary and fiscal policy. You’ll more closely examine market failures and government involvement in the economy.

Your studies will culminate as a senior in a research thesis. You will prepare an original research proposal on a topic that interests you, conduct research, and present your results with close faculty guidance from start to finish.

Economics Learning Outcomes

Research

As an Economics major you will have the opportunity to conduct research on and off campus.

Senior Seminar in Economics (EC 410 A-B) provides all Economics majors with the opportunity to complete a major research project on a topic of their choice. This two semester class includes a review of research methods and skills and an exposure to peer-reviewed scholarly research in various sub-fields in economics. In the first semester students prepare an original research proposal. During the second semester students complete their research, submit a final written thesis, and present their results.

Recent student research topics include:

2016

Predictors of Orphan Product Approval: A Comparison Between the United States of America and the European Union – Brianna Healy

Effort and Compensation: An Analysis of NBA Players’ Productivity in Contract Years – Nate Hodge

Renewable Portfolio Standards: Solar Energy Investment in the United States – Erica Kamerzel

The Impact that School Size and Administration Costs Per Pupil Has on Student Outcomes In Vermont’s Public High Schools – Tanner Pratt

The Price of a “Great Wall” – Michael Conor McNally

2015

Engendering Social Change for Long Term Development: A Model Comparing Three Types of NGOs – Sarah Healey

What is the Role of Intellectual Property Rights in Innovation and Economic Growth? A Cross-Country Analysis – Amanda Battista

Drinking Water Infrastructure in Rust Belt Cities: Public Health and Finance Challenges in the Twenty-First Century – Peter McKenna

Determining the Feasibility of Universal Anti-Retroviral Drug Therapy for HIV Patients in Developing Communities: A Comparison of the Economic Agent Across Two Frameworks – Benjamin Rosbrook

Does E=α? A Comprehensive Study of Environmental Impact Based Investing – August Koch

2014

The Relationship Between Gender Diversity in Executive Management and Financial Performance – Courtney Bedell

Predicting Rigor: Criteria for Qualification of State Special Education Programs – Katelyn Heath

Political Economy and the Effect of Human Capital on Indigenous Population of Guatemala – Christopher George

The Impact of Sugar Protections on Food Prices – Silke Hynes

2013

Do Major League Baseball Teams Receive a Return on Investment in First-Year Player Draft Signing Bonuses? – Jessica Morrissey

The Impact of Malpractice Payouts on the Supply of Physicians within U.S. States – Kaitlyn Newdorf

Does the Presence of Capital Punishment Deter Murder? – Nick Colangelo

Do Increased Athletic Expenditures Lead to Increased On-Court/On-Field Success

Among NCAA Division I and II Athletic Programs? – Rachele Bernache

Students can apply for competitive funding to do in-depth research projects during the summer through the Trustee Scholar Summer Research Fellowship program.

Internships

You’ll have opportunities to apply your knowledge to real-world situations through internships with businesses and organizations such as:

  • Burlington, Vt. Assessors Office
  • National Life Insurance
  • Northeast Water Resources Network
  • Nowak and Nowak Financial Services
  • UBS Paine Weber Financial Services
  • Vermont Department of Labor
  • Vermont Refugee Resettlement Program
  • Wells Fargo Securities
  • Williams & Associates Financial Services

We support internships whenever, in the judgment of the department, the internship substantially adds to the student’s background in economics. The internship must in some significant way be relevant to the discipline and offer an educational opportunity not found in traditional course work. We believe that internships can be important to a student’s educational experience for many reasons. We will specifically evaluate internship proposals on the basis of their academic merit. Approval of an internship proposal is based on the quality of a student’s proposal and the academic character of the candidate. The department is selective in its sponsorship of students and selective in its acceptance of internship sites.

Please click here for Guidelines, Policies, and Procedures.

Careers

Economics opens up many job opportunities.  As an economics major you will learn analytical, critical thinking, and communication skills that are in demand by many firms and government agencies.  After graduation, our majors go on to careers like:

  • Financial Analyst
  • Mutual Funds Associate
  • Senior Research and Statistics
  • Equity Derivatives Specialist
  • Financial Services Coordinator
  • Global Relations Management
  • Internal Sales Representative
  • Market Research Analyst
  • Account Manager
  • Climate Solutions Advisor
  • Policy Analyst

You’ll find recent Saint Michael’s economics graduates working at places like:

  • Bank of America
  • UBS Financial Services
  • Travelers Insurance Company
  • NativeEnergy
  • Cabot Creamery
  • U.S. Department of Agriculture
  • State of Maryland
  • Fidelity Investments
  • HSBC Bank

The major provides an ideal background for those who hope to pursue advanced degrees in business, law, public policy, or economics.  Recent graduates have pursued advance degrees in:

  • Law:  Syracuse, Boston University
  • MBA:  Clarkson, Boston University, Northeastern, Boston College
  • MA:  Duke, Tulane, Clark, University of Vermont
  • Ph.D.:  Rutgers, University of Michigan, University of Connecticut

For more information about careers in economics generally, visit the American Economic Association.

In Depth

Your first courses will teach you about key economic concepts and the role of markets, along with how to measure and interpret Gross Domestic Product (GDP), unemployment and price levels. You’ll examine economic instability through a study of causes and policy prescriptions from two major opposing schools of thought: Classical and Keynesian. You’ll learn about interest rates and the Federal Reserve and consider current policy debates on international trade, monetary and fiscal policy, the deficit, economic growth and productivity. You’ll also have an introduction to how economists interpret the everyday decisions of consumers, businesses and workers and apply economic analysis to real-world questions like minimum wage, business profits, taxes, outsourcing and environmental policies.

Later courses cover statistical thinking as applied to such topics as probability distributions, regressions, correlation, analysis of variance and so on. Advanced macro- and micro-economics classes in our department delve deeper into theories and policies surrounding income and price level, interest rates and monetary and fiscal policy. You’ll more closely examine market failures and government involvement in the economy.

Your studies will culminate as a senior in a research thesis. You will prepare an original research proposal on a topic that interests you, conduct research, and present your results with close faculty guidance from start to finish.

Economics Learning Outcomes

Research

As an Economics major you will have the opportunity to conduct research on and off campus.

Senior Seminar in Economics (EC 410 A-B) provides all Economics majors with the opportunity to complete a major research project on a topic of their choice. This two semester class includes a review of research methods and skills and an exposure to peer-reviewed scholarly research in various sub-fields in economics. In the first semester students prepare an original research proposal. During the second semester students complete their research, submit a final written thesis, and present their results.

Recent student research topics include:

2016

Predictors of Orphan Product Approval: A Comparison Between the United States of America and the European Union – Brianna Healy

Effort and Compensation: An Analysis of NBA Players’ Productivity in Contract Years – Nate Hodge

Renewable Portfolio Standards: Solar Energy Investment in the United States – Erica Kamerzel

The Impact that School Size and Administration Costs Per Pupil Has on Student Outcomes In Vermont’s Public High Schools – Tanner Pratt

The Price of a “Great Wall” – Michael Conor McNally

2015

Engendering Social Change for Long Term Development: A Model Comparing Three Types of NGOs – Sarah Healey

What is the Role of Intellectual Property Rights in Innovation and Economic Growth? A Cross-Country Analysis – Amanda Battista

Drinking Water Infrastructure in Rust Belt Cities: Public Health and Finance Challenges in the Twenty-First Century – Peter McKenna

Determining the Feasibility of Universal Anti-Retroviral Drug Therapy for HIV Patients in Developing Communities: A Comparison of the Economic Agent Across Two Frameworks – Benjamin Rosbrook

Does E=α? A Comprehensive Study of Environmental Impact Based Investing – August Koch

2014

The Relationship Between Gender Diversity in Executive Management and Financial Performance – Courtney Bedell

Predicting Rigor: Criteria for Qualification of State Special Education Programs – Katelyn Heath

Political Economy and the Effect of Human Capital on Indigenous Population of Guatemala – Christopher George

The Impact of Sugar Protections on Food Prices – Silke Hynes

2013

Do Major League Baseball Teams Receive a Return on Investment in First-Year Player Draft Signing Bonuses? – Jessica Morrissey

The Impact of Malpractice Payouts on the Supply of Physicians within U.S. States – Kaitlyn Newdorf

Does the Presence of Capital Punishment Deter Murder? – Nick Colangelo

Do Increased Athletic Expenditures Lead to Increased On-Court/On-Field Success

Among NCAA Division I and II Athletic Programs? – Rachele Bernache

Students can apply for competitive funding to do in-depth research projects during the summer through the Trustee Scholar Summer Research Fellowship program.

Internships

You’ll have opportunities to apply your knowledge to real-world situations through internships with businesses and organizations such as:

  • Burlington, Vt. Assessors Office
  • National Life Insurance
  • Northeast Water Resources Network
  • Nowak and Nowak Financial Services
  • UBS Paine Weber Financial Services
  • Vermont Department of Labor
  • Vermont Refugee Resettlement Program
  • Wells Fargo Securities
  • Williams & Associates Financial Services

We support internships whenever, in the judgment of the department, the internship substantially adds to the student’s background in economics. The internship must in some significant way be relevant to the discipline and offer an educational opportunity not found in traditional course work. We believe that internships can be important to a student’s educational experience for many reasons. We will specifically evaluate internship proposals on the basis of their academic merit. Approval of an internship proposal is based on the quality of a student’s proposal and the academic character of the candidate. The department is selective in its sponsorship of students and selective in its acceptance of internship sites.

Please click here for Guidelines, Policies, and Procedures.

Careers

Economics opens up many job opportunities.  As an economics major you will learn analytical, critical thinking, and communication skills that are in demand by many firms and government agencies.  After graduation, our majors go on to careers like:

  • Financial Analyst
  • Mutual Funds Associate
  • Senior Research and Statistics
  • Equity Derivatives Specialist
  • Financial Services Coordinator
  • Global Relations Management
  • Internal Sales Representative
  • Market Research Analyst
  • Account Manager
  • Climate Solutions Advisor
  • Policy Analyst

You’ll find recent Saint Michael’s economics graduates working at places like:

  • Bank of America
  • UBS Financial Services
  • Travelers Insurance Company
  • NativeEnergy
  • Cabot Creamery
  • U.S. Department of Agriculture
  • State of Maryland
  • Fidelity Investments
  • HSBC Bank

The major provides an ideal background for those who hope to pursue advanced degrees in business, law, public policy, or economics.  Recent graduates have pursued advance degrees in:

  • Law:  Syracuse, Boston University
  • MBA:  Clarkson, Boston University, Northeastern, Boston College
  • MA:  Duke, Tulane, Clark, University of Vermont
  • Ph.D.:  Rutgers, University of Michigan, University of Connecticut

For more information about careers in economics generally, visit the American Economic Association.